Blog Archive

Blog posts for July 2016

Improve your everyday work with business apps

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Multi-departmental validations: when haste makes waste

Have you ever spent days stressing out because you were waiting for an urgent confirmation which required the approval of several teams or departments?
And while you waited "patiently" for your coworkers to reach a decision and find the time to get back to you, you merely underwent 10 reminder calls per hour?
... Don't you find these situations a tad stressful?

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Good news! There is a solution: it is called a "business application".

When you go business app, you don’t come back

A business app is a custom-made application for companies or organizations designed to help its activity. It can entail:

  • a simplified approach to a bank account opening process
  • optimizing information management in order to make strategic decisions
  • or any other customized application designed to boost your efficiency

At XWiki we often face clients who suffer from this crucial information management to improve their business. They usually work on documents or excel sheets that are updated by several people asynchronously, then sent by email or replaced on a server. Multiplied versions thus start to pile up - version 1, version 2, final version, final-final version - and one can hardly decypher the information he or she is actually looking for.

A popular misconception is that the solution is too complex to implement - it isn't.

Indeed business apps will enable you to:

  • centralize information: rather than spending time searching through emails and documents that have been updated by different teams, you can collaborate on the same document;
  • enhance productivity: by obtaining multiple and quick validations you are able to handle more work in less time;
  • work stress-free: building optimized processes will reduce your pain point and improve your health - say "bye bye" to your imminent burn out.

Licence to chill

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All things considered business apps will improve your life!
... and the proof is in the pudding: here are some detailed examples of our clients.

Chronopost International was experiencing difficulty with obtaining a rapid green light from its sales teams, its IT department and its local agency network to create an account. Client requests were not centralized which resulted in inefficient communication and a tiring management process.
In less than three months, XWiki delivered a business application that significantly reduced the response time of the different teams involved. It is now possible for the sales team to know at any time which requests are ongoing and what is their status!

DCNS - an international high-tech company and one of the few global leaders in defense naval systems - went through similar difficulties.
Some teams were working on incident reporting and communicated their excel files via email. They were constantly dealing with multiple versions of the same files which resulted in information loss. Not only were these asynchronous updates not allowing an efficient status to several departments, but delaying the alerts was multiplying incidents.
This is why XWiki centralized their accident reports and developed an instant alarm system. A short time after its launch, DCNS claimed our business application had prevented more than 200 material incidents.

So why would you stress yourself when you can just as easily get a license to chill? Contact us to set up your business app project.

Sarah Nitenberg
Project Manager

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Open source. One step closer to a global standard.

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Original image created by TUBS

The world is actively turning to open-source solutions, a study shows, as 78% of the private companies run partially or integrally on open-source software. When it comes to governments and state-owned enterprises, the story is a bit different. Four economically powerful countries are known to strongly back the open source development, while others are simply implementing free solutions as a way to cut down costs. 

It all started back in 2006, when France was among the first nations worldwide to implement open source solutions as an alternative to paid software intended to be used by the government. The French government went a step further than making Paris an open source software hub. They implemented the concept in public administration and the educational system.

Ten years later, the Bulgarian Government made a surprising move and became the first country to pass a law that forces all software intended to be used by the administrative bodies to be developed based on a FOSS (free and open source software) license. This came up as an effort from the government to be more sensitive regarding public expenses and foresee any potential threats linked to the numerous vulnerabilities found after the expiration of the support contract. Moreover, “whatever custom software the government procures will be visible and accessible to everyone. After all, it’s paid by taxpayers’ money and they should both be able to see it and benefit from it.”, the Bulgarian PM’s advisor, Bozhidar Bozhanov said.

This action has been described as a bold and questionable move by both security experts and the software community. What could have been perceived before as a security threat by exposing the source code behind a government software, today is seen as a way to protect against outside threats by allowing security experts to search for vulnerabilities and report them before someone could take advantage of. Another decisive fact that supported the passing of this law through the Parliament consists in the low costs of maintenance and support. Think about Bulgaria as the 3rd country in the world in terms of certified IT professionals per capita, experiencing a tremendous 30% yearly increase and you can imagine how accessible it is to let the open source community help you develop a national software. 

On the other hand, the skeptical people could say that Bulgaria will be forced by the newly promulgated law to make available any custom code, now a matter of national security, if funded by the taxpayers’ money, but this was something the government has predicted. The list of exceptions include any FOSS intended to be used by basically any government agency related to national security.

By taking this decision, Bulgaria has pushed the open-source concept one step closer to being implemented worldwide, as a standard and not as a niche idea, eventually becoming a commonly perceived practice. Well done, Bulgaria!

George Nikolic
Marketing Specialist @ XWiki

The XWiki Seminar 2016

All the XWiki team was involved last week in the 8th edition of the company seminar. 

The XWiki Seminar 2016 was built around the Task Force - Commando theme and challenged the team members with several missions to successfully fulfil within a week!

After an active participation at the morning status sessions, demos and hackathons, all the forces were called together for several team missions: creating an unique symbol, identification sign for the team (the XWiki Coat of Arms), getting to know more about the personality, strengths and weaknesses through a test, building and flying paper aircrafts and creating quick, simple and tasty desserts to celebrate the accomplishments and the 12-year existence of the company. ...