Blog Archive

Blog posts for November 2017

How to write a SOP with XWiki Procedures

Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) are a set of step-by-step instructions compiled by an organization to help workers carry out complex routine operations. XWiki offers you a versatile and ready-to-use structure for all interested domains: management, IT development, marketing, HR, transportation and many more. This is a solution suitable for any department of an enterprise searching to put in place a procedure which would streamline their processes.

Here are 4 steps to create easy-to-follow SOPs:

1. Do your research

A key planning activity for writing effective procedures is to understand the process that will be documented within the procedure. That starts with research or, in other words, collecting information.

This would include doing things like interviewing process owners and process doers. They are the go-to people when requesting related information because of their insight and involvement into the process. In addition, research should help you build objectives by learning process capabilities and by benchmarking industry leaders performances in targeted areas.

Do: Include screenshots, images, videos and best case practices.

Don't: Avoid connecting tasks to specific tools, as they might change over time.

Search tool

2. Establish the bigger picture

Your task is to create a situation where employees aren’t simply just following procedures. They want to understand the roles they play in company success.

By setting goals aligned to the organizational strategy, they will be more motivated to improve the procedures as they will grow along with the company. Therefore, keep in mind that your procedures would need to explain the actions towards the accomplishment of your business plan, while documenting the involved steps and the effects of interactions with other processes. 

Do: Show where a procedure's success falls under the company's growth plan.

Don't: Forget to brief in all departments involved in the well-going of the procedure. 

Procedures categories

3. Provide a structure 

A written procedure is a step-by-step guide to direct the reader through a task, so keep things simple and clear. With XWiki Procedures you have the chance to expand procedures to a company level, or just keep it neat for a team. Give your procedure a structure that will ease the efforts done by your employees instead of sending them on a time consuming path.

Do: Insist on the sequence and correlation of the tasks, as it will help when following them.

Don't: Leave out steps just because they seem obvious. They never are. 

Procedures sidebar structure

4. Involve employees

Give employees ownership so they can contribute to the way things are happening in your organization. For most companies, the problem isn’t necessary with the procedure, but with how the procedure is presented to employees. Make them enjoyable, easy to follow, and most of all - appreciate those taking the time to improve them.

Do: Brainstorms and offer guidance before instilling a new procedure, so everyone is fully on-board. 

Don't: Just add a procedure, take the time to explain all things left unclear and amend where necessary. 

Assign user responsibilities

Conclusions:

1. Research what the competition does and what steps you need to follow, customize it to your needs. 

2. Emphasize the bigger picture and how procedures help your company thrive. 

3. Take the time to make the procedure structured, easy to follow and have clear tasks.

4. Give ownership to those working on the procedure. Encourage them to improve it. 

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Let's meet at Paris Open Source Summit 2017

We are pleased to announce that, between 6 - 7 December, we will be attending, speaking and networking at Paris Open Source Summit.

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The event will take place at Les Docks de Paris on Wednesday the 6th and Thursday the 7th of December 2017. You can find us at booth B13.

The full schedule and list of stands are now available. The entry, just like any other year, is free and you can register here.  

This year, Ludovic Dubost, our CEO, will host a track on the 6th of December, with the subject: "One Job, One Solution" - open source solutions for the end user. Speakers from Avencall, Axelor, CryptPad, Matrix, BlueMind, Maarch, Nexedi, Open-DSI, ATOL C&D, Rudder and France Labs will join him from 13h30 to 18h00, in location Clap. In this track, Aaron McSween, our research engineer, will be talking about "Cryptpad: Secure Online Collaboration" from 15h00 to 15h15. 

In parallel, from 14h50 to 15h10, Ludovic will tackle the subject of "How can traditional companies benefit from tools used by the leading tech companies", with an in-depth comparison of such tools, in the Dematerialisation track. 

From 17h10 to 17h30, you can meet Ludovic at the Round Table: "Valorisation et dissémination par l’Open Source : quels enseignements tirer de projets existants ? Panel "Enseignements pratiques et économiques"".

Looking forward to meeting you all and answer all the questions you might have about our community. Until then, follow us on Twitter where we will keep you up-to-date with our latest developments. 

XWiki's Ludovic Dubost hosts track on 'One job, one solution' - Open Source solutions for the end user

Updated with links to the presentations. 

Which is more likely to be better: a software package created by a handful of developers, or a software package created by thousands of developers? Just as there are countless developers and users working to improve the security of open source software, there are just as many innovating new features and enhancements to those products.

Paris Open Source Summit 2017 has granted us the opportunity to lead a track on the importance of Open Source solutions in the end user software industry. Ludovic will be the trackleader, and joining him will be 11 international specialists from the Open Source world. The focus of this track will be on the key differentiators and the benefits Open Source solutions can bring, in comparison with closed-source competitors. Benefits as: security, quality, customizability, flexibility, interoperability, support options and many more. 

See you in Clap room, starting with 13h30? 

The program and presentations:

13h30-14h00Open Source Applications competing against proprietary on-premise and Cloud SolutionsFRLudovic Dubost, XWiki
14h00-14h20XWiki, Wiki Collaboration as an alternative to Confluence or SharepointFRVincent Massol, XWiki
14h20-14h40Xivo, la téléphonie Open Source, concurrent de Centrex et Skype / LyncFRLaurent Demange, Avencall
14h40-15h00Un ERP Open SourceFRLaith Jubair, Axelor
15h00-15h15Cryptpad: Secure Online CollaborationENAaron McSween, Cryptpad/XWiki
15h15-15h30Encrypted decentralised communication with Matrix and Riot as an alternative to Slack.ENMatthew Hodgson, Matrix
16h00-16h20BlueMind,l’alternative Open Source à MS Exchange, O365 ou Gmail.FRSylvain Garcia, BlueMind
16h20-16h40Maarch RM : Archivage électronique normé pour les entreprisesFRJean-Louis Ercolani, Maarch
16h40-17h00Nexedi, un ERP Open SourceFRJean-Paul Smets, Nexedi
17h00-17h15 Dolibarr, un ERP orienté TPE & PMEFRPhilippe Scofoni, Open-DSI
17h15-17h30REMOcRA, une solution open source au service de la gestion des risquesFRCharles-Henry Vagner, ATOL C&D
17h30-17h45Rudder, l’outil DevOPS Open Source d’automatisation et de vérificationFRAlexis Mousset, Rudder
Ilan Costa, Jaguar Network
17h45-18h00Datafari, gérer ses documents avec une solution de rechercheFRCédric Ulmer, France Labs