Solutions

Category: Solutions (35 posts) [RSS]

Sep 16 2019

The 5 golden rules for a successful Knowledge Base

Information is power, and that power relies on quick and easy access to quality information. Today’s connected users don’t want to wait for a letter, a mail or even a phone call to get in the possession of their desired information, they want it now and they want it at a click away. That’s why you need a strong, structured knowledge base.

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Why should you choose a Knowledge Base? 

According to definitions, a Knowledge Base (KB) is a technology used to store complex structured and unstructured information used by a computer system. The initial use of the term was in connection with expert systems which were the first knowledge-based systems. In today's terms, it’s a self-serve online library that contains everything one might want to know about your product or business. Unlike a real library, a knowledge base is at a click away, every day.

Depending on your business’s specific, your knowledge base will take various structures, for it will include information from every employee, department, stakeholder or interested person. It can include everything from thorough details of what your business does, study cases on how to use your features, internal procedures, troubleshooting tips or frequently asked questions. And here’s the catch, it's stored online, easily accessible via search or a link, therefore: goodbye long threads of emails.

These solutions really work for the modern companies and those keeping up with market changes, and using XWiki Knowledge Bases you get a solution that allows you to access critical business information in a fast and efficient way. You don't need to worry about email overload or loss of critical information when someone leaves the company. XWiki helps you increase productivity and reduce operational costs, while regular backups prevent information loss.

So, what are the rules for a successful Knowledge Base?

1. Establish what you need and how you plan to use it

This means that you must assess how much time you might save if you and your employees would start using it. If the volume is consistent and the questions or tasks are repetitive, a knowledge base could work wonders for your business. Once you decide you need one, establish if you plan to use it internal or open to customers. Finding the right information at the right time can be a challenge for both your employees and your customers, especially when business-related information is scattered within your workforce's minds and computers across your organization.

2. Give a structure to the content

Go beyond simple text and add structure to pages, so you and other users can always know where to find a particular answer or the procedure in place. Design forms and templates for your pages and use tables to filter and sort pages so you will never worry about a cluttered virtual workspace again. Last, but highly important, enable anyone to edit pages using standard web forms. XWiki’s knowledge base comes with some great features to enhance adding new content: use the WYSIWYG editor to make changes; attach any kind of files to pages; import and preview office documents; export pages in different formats; define different layers of security by setting rights for users.

3. Keep your Knowledge Base user-friendly

Once it’s up and running, remember that your knowledge base is a self-serve operation. You’ll need to make sure your knowledge base is easy to navigate. And easy to use. Allow contributors to use quick templates to upload data. Use labels/search terms to categorize information so articles are easy to find. At the same time, with XWiki, your company's knowledge is organized and searchable. XWiki allows you to describe wiki pages by adding additional information (metadata) on top of the documents. You can create a structure that matches your exact needs.

4. Keep information relevant

For example, with XWiki, you can easily have a catalog that displays all contracts with the ability to instantly sort them by date, contract parties or type of documents. Use annotations to write contextual notes on pages, share pages by email with any user, allow users to leave comments and feedback on content and keep track of every change over the content with watch feature. In XWiki, you can compare any two-page versions, so you can always track amends to the content.

5. Let the Knowledge Base work for you

Benefit from the XWiki metadata management and native flexibility, our key differentiators from other wiki solutions, in order to organize your knowledge in a centralized and easy to use way!

TRY XWIKI FOR FREE

Sep 06 2019

XWiki Active Directory Application - connect XWiki to your organization directory

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What is Active Directory (AD)?

Active Directory is a directory services implementation developed by Microsoft that provides a hierarchical structure for storing information. Additional functionalities include authentication, user and group management and a framework to deploy related services (Lightweight Directory Services, Certificate Services, Federation Services, and Rights Management). For example, the directory service Active Directory Domain Services (commonly known as AD DS or AD) stores information about user accounts from your organization (names, passwords, phone numbers, etc) and enables other authorized users on the same network to access this information.
The Active Directory service supports the LDAP1 and the Kerberos as protocols2 which act like guidelines to send and receive information.3

Key benefits for using Active Directory:

  • Hierarchical structure to store information regarding your organization.
  • Allows Single-SignOn (SSO) and works well on an intranet environment and over VPN
  • The ability to access and modify AD DS from multiple points of administration
  • A single point of access to network resources.
  • Ability to communicate with external networks running previous versions of Active Directory including Unix.

How can you connect XWiki to Active Directory?

The XWiki team has built an Active Directory application that allows to easily connect your Active Directory server to XWiki using a visual editor.

XWikiActiveDirectory-administration.png

User and group management is one of the most used features of the Active Directory application allowing XWiki to be integrated with users and groups from your existing AD organization directory. For example:

  • Active Directory users will be able to authenticate in the wiki and a dedicated XWiki user will be created automatically at the first login.
  • User synchronization: update different user properties (e.g. first name, last name, email, etc)  including the photo.
  • The Active Directory groups can be mapped to XWiki groups which will store as members the users belonging to an Active Directory group.
  • The groups will be synchronized on every authentication of a user.

XWikiActiveDirectory-mapping.png

Key benefits of using the Active Directory application:

  • Reuse the information from an existing Active Directory server.
  • Provides a visual editor inside the wiki Administration section to ease configuration 
  • Allows you to make changes without restarting the application server
  • Instant access to new features and bug fixes upon update 
  • Support

How can you get the Active Directory application?

To try it out, search for Active Directory application in your wiki's Extension Manager, then install the app and get the trial.

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The Active Directory application offers an easy way to connect your XWiki and you can purchase it directly from the Extension Manager, or with other XWiki services:

  • You can request a free license if you are a Silver+ Support customer (XWiki On Premise or XWiki Cloud)
  • It is included with the XWiki Pro package, a full set of supported apps that will extend the standard platform to improve productivity

1 LDAP is an open computer network authentication protocol supported by many different directory services and access management solutions.
2 Kerberos is a computer network authentication protocol for websites and Single-Sign-On implementations across platforms. It uses strong cryptography and third-party ticket authorization.
3 Source: https://www.varonis.com/blog/the-difference-between-active-directory-and-ldap

Oana Florea - Customer Support Manager @XWiki

Sep 02 2019

How to Create Diagrams in XWiki

Diagrams are great for easily conveying ideas in a visual manner. They’re useful for both communicating the big picture and breaking down complex concepts.

With the right tool, diagramming becomes easy. The XWiki Pro Diagram app provides a clean user interface, based on the jgraph/draw.io integration. Draw.io is a web-based open source diagramming software for creating wireframes, mockups, UML, charts, BPMN, mind maps, network diagrams and much more.

Using the app you can edit and view diagrams straight in your wiki. Each diagram is stored in a wiki page. The revisions of the diagrams are synced in XWiki. The app provides intuitive functionalities and is perfectly suited for both beginners and advanced users.

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By using this tool you will be able to:

  • add and edit new diagrams
  • import existing diagrams
  • include diagrams in other wiki pages

Starting with the 1.7 release of the Diagram Pro Application you get improved PDF exports of diagrams. Additionally, images inserted in a diagram are now stored as attachments on the diagram page.

To try the app you can install it directly from your instance using the Extension Manager. The best part is that you won’t have to spend hours learning how to use it. You only need a few minutes to master the basics.

If you're already an XWiki customer, starting with our Silver plan you have free access to the whole set of XWiki Pro apps, including the Diagram Application. Please get in touch with our support team and they will send you a free license.

Stay tuned for our next release which will bring support for XWiki links inside diagrams exported to PDF, as well as zoom buttons in view mode.

Finally, you can also get a taste of the app with this one minute video:


Silvia Macovei, Head of Cloud Business at XWiki

Aug 21 2019

15 Ways Remote Companies Can Build Strong Teams

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Working remotely is great for many reasons: a bigger talent pool, better work / life balance, more focus and productivity. But it also has its challenges, with a need to implement more tools, processes, documentation and also put more effort into building a culture of transparency. Over the past 15 years we've been embracing flexible work, with people having the liberty to work either fully or partly remotely. In this article we explore some of the things we've learned and tips companies can follow to build stronger remote teams.

1. Communicate your story and the company vision

Telling your story and having a clear vision for your company are not only good for business, but they're also essential to your team's cohesion. The company story reminds people how you got there, while the vision statement sets the direction for the future. Defining the impact that the company wants to make on the world will also help the team better understand why their work matters and how their objectives align with the bigger picture. The goals for the vision are to inspire and engage the team.

2. Define your values

Values are the unique principles that inform how the vision will be achieved. Values should be clearly articulated and written down in a handbook, so everyone can read them as they on-board the team. Decisions should then be through the lens of the values. Since every new employee will have an impact on your culture, it’s important that you also recruit having those values in mind. Leaders should set the example by defining and then living by these principles. Values are not set in stone though, so as your team grows, you may want to reexamine them.

3. Organize work

Building the infrastructure that allows people to collaborate efficiently is essential. Teams should have access to different collaboration tools such as Slack, Mattermost or Riot for chat, XWiki for collaboration and knowledge management, Trello, OpenProject or GitLab for project and task management. At XWiki we use Riot to keep in touch with the team and we love it. It's very easy to use and it's open source. Not surprisingly, most of our work is organized in XWiki, customized with apps to make it fit our exact needs.

online chat gif from canity

4. Build a culture of transparency and knowledge sharing

Knowledge sharing and solid processes should be at the heart of all distributed companies. They make onboarding easier and help drive transparency. Knowledge sharing also increases efficiency and minimizes friction as information becomes readily available for employees across different time zones.

At XWiki we try to document knowledge as much as possible, through product and project documentation, knowledge bases, FAQs, onboarding guides etc. A good rule of thumb is that whenever someone asks a questions on a chat the answers should point as much as possible to documents. Of course it's easier to post a direct answer on the chat, but it's more useful on the long run to store that answer in a document for later reference.

5. Recruit for soft skills, not just technical skills

When evaluating a potential employee it’s important to assess technical skills, but you should also look at soft skills and culture fit. Excellent communication and writing abilities are essential to thrive in a remote role.

Many distributed teams also find it useful to have the candidate do a small paid assignment before making a job offer. This will help the candidate get a better understanding of the job and it will help the team in better assessing the fit.

6. Make video calls

With non-verbal cues missing from written communication, using video as much as possible can be a good idea. While it doesn’t replace in person interactions, it does help eliminate some of the loneliness and isolation that some remote workers eventually face. Tools such as Zoom and Google Hangouts are great options for organizing video calls. In the future we might even work in a VR office altogether.

7. Have regular meetings

All hands are great for introducing new team members, making announcements, recognizing accomplishments, providing company statuses, answering questions. Many remote companies also have regular team meetings, project kick-offs and retrospectives, as well as daily “stand-ups”.

team meetings

8. Organize company retreats

Chat is great, but nothing beats real face to face interactions. Regular company retreats are great opportunities for people to consolidate relationships that are mainly built virtually. You can find out more about how we organize our annual retreat by reading this article.

9. Strive for balance between synchronous and asynchronous communication

The balance between synchronous and asynchronous communication is hard to achieve. For long discussions, important feedback and brainstorming, face time can be better. Async however is equally important when you’re trying to get into a state of flow and do the deep work. Many remote workers will say async is how they manage to get their work done. There are many ways of doing async, from email to chats, forums and comments. You just have to pick the tools and the ratio that work best for you and your team.

10. Encourage company traditions

It’s easy to celebrate events and set up traditions when people see each other every day in the office, but there are things you can also do as a remote team. Some ideas include celebrating birthdays, organizing hackathons and other challenges, going on company and team offsite retreats.

11. Have a virtual water cooler

When you’re working in a virtual environment, you may end up talking only about work. It’s also easy to forget taking breaks. However, informal chats that go beyond work are essential for building rapport, keeping healthy, energized and productive. Don’t be afraid to use emoticons and gifs to convey emotion.

Donut is a great Slack extension that randomly pairs people from different teams. They’re then encouraged to chat about their lives and get to know each other better.

12. Provide and collect regular feedback

Critical feedback should be delivered face to face as much as possible. This way you can also see all the non-verbal cues, which are not visible via chat or email. A good rule of thumb is that if a chat escalates or is taking too long, it might be worth doing a video call instead. Trusting the team and assuming miscommunication (not bad intentions) are good principles to live by.

Collecting anonymous feedback is a great way to measure team happiness and also to see what may be improved across the board.

13. Do one on ones

Leading your team in a remote culture requires a lot of pro-activity. Since impromptu conversations are less likely to happen, it’s important to schedule regular one on ones with the team. You should try not to turn one on ones into status updates though. Having a shared online agenda can help with keeping the conversations on track. Creating a list of actionable items at the end can help follow through with the points discussed.

14. Measure employee performance

In a remote setting, employees may spend much of their time wondering whether they’re actually doing a good job, particularly if they worked in a traditional setting before. Productivity can’t be measured in the number of hours spent in the office, so it’s important to focus on setting objectives and measuring output. Metrics, coupled with the team’s feedback and one on ones should provide the context for measuring and improving performance.

15. Invest in the mental well-being of your team

Without an office to go to every day, people may end up feeling disconnected. On top of that, Impostor Syndrome might start creeping in. It's the feeling that we don’t deserve what we’ve earned and that others will expose us as frauds. It’s particularly an issue with remote work, were people don’t get to see you at your desk everyday.

Keeping a record of accomplishments and providing/receiving timely feedback can help. Coworking spaces or professional networks can be great places to meet like minded people and have more face to face interactions. Many companies offer a coworking stipend.

Most remote employees have the liberty to organize their time according to their needs, which is one of the main perks. But that can also easily backfire if the team stay connected 24/7. Companies should encourage breaks and discourage overtime.

fish tank gif from canity

If you’re interested in learning more about remote work, we also recommend:

As technology evolves, the way we think about work is being transformed and we’re bound to have more companies challenging the status quo and adopting a remote-first culture. I’d love to hear your thoughts.

Silvia Macovei, Head of Cloud Business at XWiki

Aug 15 2019

Top 10 XWiki questions and their solutions

Whether you’re just starting your XWiki journey or you're already an advanced user, you probably wondered about any existing documentation or didn't have the time to look for the right information. Throughout the years you sent through our contact form, by email, on the Community Forum or support tickets numerous queries that showed your interest in having XWiki tips & tricks available at hand. We heard you. We built a Help Center for our services and we’re constantly working on improving our documentation.

Even more, we are now bringing a list of the most common XWiki support tickets and their solutions to help users further in their collaboration journey.

1. How do I contact the XWiki Support team?

If you have acquired professional support services from our XWiki SAS team, you should create a ticket on XWiki Network or write an email to support@xwiki.com. Here are some best practices when you are reporting an issue. Did you know you can also report a bug or request a feature on our XWiki open source project's Jira tracking software?

2. How do I to set rights in my wiki?

With XWiki, thanks to the different permission types, it's easy to manage the access to actions like: read, edit, comment, delete etc. We added a number of basic rules that help both simple and advanced users understand why they cannot access certain pages or do certain actions in the wiki. If you want to make your wiki public or private, this is the access setup documentation you'd need to check. Moreover, read here how to set rights on a specific page and/or its child pages.

An example would be that when you decide to explicitly allow the view right for "Group A" on a given page, users that are not members of "Group A" must have the view right explicitly set on the given page to be able to view it as well. Plus, the wiki owner and the superadmin account always have full admin privileges regardless of the configured rights.

3. What are the Features for Simple versus Advanced Users?

To note that the table below refers only to basic differences between the types of XWiki users. The access to these features could be customized through rights assignment or switch from simple to advanced user. Check this page for more details regarding simple and advanced page editing modes. Bonus tip: Admins would need to switch to the Advanced mode in their profile preferences to enable the extra options on the top main menu.

XWiki Features for Simple versus Advanced users

4. How do I enable features deactivated by default?

There are a number of features deactivated by default in XWiki in order to leave the possibility to the user to personalize their experience within the platform. Here are some examples: hidden pages (technical content such as application classes, configuration pages, macros, styles, scripts, etc), extra accessibility features (visual enhancements like bigger fonts, underlined links, etc), extension conflict setup, multilingual mode.

As a standard user, you could enable the display of hidden pages, extra accessibility features or choose the user type from your profile page, in the Preferences tab.

User Preferences View

There are also editing features disabled by default in the CKEditor (the default WYSIWYG editor starting with XWiki 8.2): plugins (bidi, colorbutton, font, justify, save, specialchar), toolbar features (Anchor, Find, Paste, PasteFromWord, PasteText). These are available in the Administration of your wiki, and they could be modified by an Administrator.

ckeditor-administration

5. How do I change the appearance of my wiki?

During the journey of adapting XWiki to their needs, the users are looking into ways to personalize the wiki according to their company branding, business goals or personal preferences. See here how to change the logo, background color or the panels. For those interested into more advanced customization levels visit the skin page and discover the complete skins-related guide on XWiki.org.

6. Are there page templates?

If you already have some predefined content and you are looking for ready-to-use templates, here are some examples of available templates inside XWiki.

Article
article.png
Encyclopedia
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Meeting Report
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Simple Page
simple.png

Learn more on how you can also create your own page templates

7. How do I turn on/off the Comments & Page History?

In the Administration of your wiki, go to the Look & Feel tab, in the Presentation section and select the page tabs you would like to be visible at the bottom of your wiki pages. Bonus tip: in the same location you can also configure the header and footer content.

Comments and Page History

8. How do I compare two versions of a page?

In order to compare 2 versions, you need to select one of the radio buttons corresponding to the version from which you want to start the comparison. These are the buttons located in the "From" column. You will then need to select the button corresponding to the version you want to compare the previously selected version against. These buttons are located in the "To" column. You may choose to include minor edits in the comparison. After selecting the 2 versions you wish to compare you will need to click on "Compare selected versions". Moreover, clicking on either one of the 2 compared version numbers (shown in the header) will display that version of the page.

Comparing two page versions

9. How do I restore deleted pages?

Did you delete a page that you now noticed had an important role in your wiki? There is a way to restore it. Access the Page Index, available in the drawer menu on the top right of the wiki. You will discover there all pages, attachments, deleted pages, deleted attachments in your wiki. Go to the deleted pages tab and search for the desired page. In the Actions column, you will now notice the possibility to restore or to delete forever a page from the trash. Find out more about restoring and deleting pages in XWiki.

indexalldocsdeleted

10. How do I set a Custom Server Name for my XWiki Cloud instance?

Our Silver+ XWiki Cloud users benefit from Custom Server Names. When setting up a custom server, the first thing to consider is purchasing a security certificate. It's important to note that you own this custom domain, thus we request from you a security certificate that would be used to provide a secure connection. After you send it to the support team, there is one setting you'd need to add to your instance, such as your wiki's CNAME to point to "cloud.xwiki.com." (the final dot is important emoticon_smile ). And then, contact the support team to ask for the final adjustments.

learning

I hope you enjoyed the article and that you find the answers useful.

Andreea Chirica, Communications and Support Specialist at XWiki

Jul 26 2019

Top 3 user experience integrations for your XWiki website

Thinking of a new website? Or have you ever felt that your existing website is a boring, monotonous one lost in the sea of thousands of unique, interactive websites? Here is how you can make things a little more interesting and turn the tide in your favor. Comes in: website user experience (UX). It refers to how your users use, see and remember the website.

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What is "user experience" on a website?

To understand user experience (UX), you will have to know what user interface (UI) is and what it does. User Interface (UI) is a medium through which users interact with your website. Conventionally, it means action buttons, text, visuals or any tool that triggers interaction.

Now, user experience (UX) in website design is about how the user feels, either when interacting with the UI elements of your website or simply when onboarding your website. User experience (UX) maintains the flow and engages the customer throughout their journey on your website. A well-designed user experience (UX) will have the power to influence the mood or behavior of the user interacting with your website.

In this article, we will talk about how some simple tweaks can enhance the user experience (UX) for your public website based on XWiki, and delight your users.

1. Privacy matters, and its user experience as well

As of 25 May 2018, the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) has become an enforceable regulation in EU law. It covers data protection and privacy for all individual citizens of the European Union (EU) and the European Economic Area (EEA) as well as the transfer of personal data outside the member states.

If your public website is serving individuals from the EU and you - or embedded third-party services like Google and Facebook - are processing any kind of personal data, you need to obtain prior consent from the visitor/user.

To increase user experience (UX) for the public websites built with XWiki, you can use the free app GDPR Cookie Consent to achieve and maintain cookie compliance. The app describes the data processing needs in plain language to the visitor/user, before processing any personal data.

Different configuration options are available, including updating the look and feel to match your website colors or using text/labels in the language of your target users.

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The GDPR Cookie Consent app on a standard XWiki

For further details, you can take a look at the blog article on the GDPR compliance with XWiki's cookies consent application.

2. Reduce the communication gap

One of the most common features for a public website is the "Contact us" form. It’s where a new user goes when they have a question or needs precise information regarding your organization. Website user experience (UX) best practices suggest that nowadays' must is real-time communication. However, the old-fashioned “contact form” does not offer a feeling of direct communication and will downgrade your user's experience.

Integrating a Chat solution in addition to the "Contact us" form will not only improve communication with your users but also add a personal touch to the conversation.

For example, Zendesk offers a flexible Chat solution including a "Lite" free version which could be a good starting point for a small business/organization. The chat widget can be easily embedded within the XWiki platform by just adding the Javascript code on one of the Administration fields (e.g. the end of the “HTTP Meta Info” field from the wiki Administration section) with an Admin user.

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Embedding Zendesk on XWiki

The “Chat” widget will be available on the right bottom corner and the message window will pop up upon click.

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Zendesk Chat embedded on XWiki Cloud

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Zendesk Chat embedded on xwiki.com

3. A powerful search engine for great user experience

Search is one of the core functionalities for any public website and the now, standard, search icon.png icon stands proudly on the homepage of dozens of the world's best websites. When you have a lot of data to share, it’s important to help your users quickly find what they are looking for while still keeping an eye on their experience on the website.

As of 2013, XWiki has been using the powerful Solr search engine to index the wiki content which brought a superior search experience to the product:

  • More relevant results and extracts in search results,
  • Faceted search,
  • Better advanced searching,
  • Support for clustering,
  • Google-like searching (i.e. no need to use wildcards),
  • Better translation support,
  • Improved performances,
  • And generally speaking, all the niceties provided by Apache Solr.

To increase your website's user experience (UX), the search engine can be customized to better index the data and offer the most relevant results. Our team has recently delivered such a project for the Historical Dictionary of Switzerland (DHS).

The DHS is an encyclopedia on the history of Switzerland which aims to take into account the results of modern historical research in a manner accessible to a broader audience. The new public website built on top of XWiki has been online since May 2019. 

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The Solr search engine on the homepage of The Historical Dictionary of Switzerland

Understanding the importance of user experience (UX) on your website is imperative when it comes to managing it. In the end, it is what can either make it or break it. Users seek more than a simple, lifeless interface, which is why well-thought-out user experience (UX) will point you in the right direction and help users feel at home on your website.

What other integrations do you find worth mentioning when it comes to enhancing user experience (UX) on a website? Feel free to share it with us and we will add it on the list! 

Oana Florea - Customer Support Manager @XWiki

May 21 2019

Five things successful remote teams share

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This article was first published on LinkedIn

More and more companies are starting to work in distributed teams, as they’re looking to reach a global pool of talent and service clients in multiple time zones. Working across geographical boundaries and time zones can become a competitive advantage when you’re trying to reach a global audience, but it also comes with challenges. In this piece, we explore five things successful distributed teams share.

1. Tools for the digital workplace

In a remote setting, communication is key. Relying solely on email is not efficient. With team members and clients spread across different timezones, your inbox will quickly fill up with messages, making it hard to stay eloquent, organized and productive. Your team will likely rely on different tools to get work done and for day to day interactions. Both synchronous and asynchronous communication are important.

Tools like Slack, Matrix, XWiki, GitHub, GitLab, Jira offer a convenient way to store knowledge, work on projects and keep in touch with your team.

Non-verbal cues give us context. Without them, it’s easy to misinterpret the text. So you’ll likely also be using solutions like Zoom or Hangouts for video and voice meetings.

An eSignature tool will often help you avoid the hassle of scanning or sending physical documents back and forth.

2. Trust & transparency

When hiring for a distributed team you’ll want to work with people who have a track record of getting things done. Trust is essential, when you’re not sharing the same office with your colleagues and results are not measured by the number of hours spent in the office. With trust, comes the responsibility of getting things done.

Accountability is built on trust and trust is built on transparency. In an open and transparent culture, people can communicate freely and enjoy quick access to the information they need to get their best work done.

Many teams favor an agile approach, where each team member posts what they’ve accomplished that week, what they’ll be working on next week, as well as any issues they’ve come across.

3. Processes

Good processes are important for providing structure and not reinventing the wheel. However, processes should not be rigid or set in stone, blocking innovation (aka “we’ve always done it this way”).

4. Core hours

When you’re working across multiple time zones, most work hours will not overlap. Some core hours might be useful though to easily organize meetings and resolve urgent matters.

5. Face time

Successful distributed teams regularly have all hands and team meetings, as well as one-on-one talks to align on the company and career goals. Recording meetings is often a good idea, so team members who couldn’t join the live events may be able to check them out.

Direct, personal interactions are also extremely valuable. Many companies have regular retreats where the whole team get together to better know each other, work on projects, have fun and celebrate their accomplishments. Smaller teams might also have their own trips to align and work together.

In the end, companies find their own recipes for working in distributed teams, with the best ones building unique cultures along the way.

What are some of your tips?

Silvia Macovei, Head of Cloud Business

May 15 2019

Why choose an Open Source solution for your company

If you are the decision-maker for a startup or a large company, you count on people, employees or collaborators to create value for your customers. For that to happen, they need quick access to the right information at any given time. In our mobile-centric world, the collaborative solutions you choose will dictate the success of your business. You need a solution to organize your knowledge, communicate with various teams, and with the clients spread around the world.

Why choose a collaborative solution in lieu of traditional communication means? Information is getting lost in email threads, exposed to undesired audiences, or placed chaotically in documents that go back and forward. Your business is suffering when you and your collaborators don't have the right information or the solution required by the client. 

Ludovic Dubost, the Founder of XWiki and CEO of XWiki SAS, discussed with EFFORST on solutions for modern companies, for those decision-makers that want to scale business in a healthy way. 


Are our solutions right for you?

Are you struggling with information management and organization? XWiki has been built to help companies with knowledge organizing and sharing (with solutions as Intranet, Extranet, Digital Workplace, Knowledge Base and custom projects), ready to adapt to the specifics of your company and processes.

Do you and your online collaborators wish for an encrypted, private editing tool that provides total control in terms of the content and documents you are working on? CryptPad makes this possible with a web-based suite of editors that use encryption to provide private collaborative editing. Share text, code, presentations, polls, todo lists, kanbans and many more.

Our team is ready to offer professional services to help your company implement and tailor tools that answer to your needs. emoticon_smile

Apr 08 2019

Building a powerful knowledge base with XWiki Pro

Collaboration tools are enabling both large and small businesses to digitalize and transform their operations.

At XWiki, we help companies centralize and organize their information, so knowledge doesn’t get lost and teams work better together.

If you’re looking to go one step further in your knowledge management journey you don't want to miss out on XWiki Pro, a full set of apps that will extend the standard platform to improve productivity and achieve clarity across your organization. 

XWiki Pro addresses three key challenges that companies share:

  • fostering collaboration and aligning teams;

  • displaying and organizing information, in the best and most efficient way;

  • integrating with other tools, so everything remains accessible from one place.

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When it comes to boosting team collaboration and transparency, the Calendar app is an excellent choice to keep up with events, while team meetings can be planned using the dedicated app. The Forum app encourages conversations and knowledge sharing between team members, while the Ideas application offers the perfect setting for fostering innovation.

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The second set of apps addresses your needs for creating and organizing content. The File Manager can be used to manage files inside the wiki. With the Diagram app, you’ll be able to enrich your content and create various types of diagrams straight from your wiki pages.

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We know that teams can use lots of other different tools to create and manage content. Depending on your specific needs, you can also work seamlessly with integrations such as Office365, Google Apps, OnlyOffice, Active Directory.

XWiki Pro is not only about apps though. It’s also about real support, performed by real people. Our team of experts is ready to guide you through each step of your XWiki journey.

Last, but not least, your contributions to XWiki Pro go towards building and improving the XWiki open source product and applications.

If you’re a technical support customer or a cloud user, you already have access to XWiki Pro starting with the Silver level.

XWiki offers a great way to create and organize information. Using structured data and XWiki Pro you can go a step further in adapting knowledge management to your needs, implementing a tool that is completely customized for your organization.

To try it out, search for XWiki Pro in your wiki's Extension Manager, then install the app and get the trial.

Silvia Macovei, Head of Cloud Business
 

Sep 20 2018

GDPR compliance with XWiki's cookies consent application

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In light of the latest European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), our team has created a Cookies Consent application to help XWiki users ensure compliance. It is free to install and customize to match your brand identity. You can find installation instructions on our store.

But, first, does my organization need to be EU GDPR compliant?

There are two types of responsibilities regarding the protection of personal data: data “controllers” and data “processors”. It should also be noted that the personal data of employees is included in the scope of this regulation. So, the organizations that need to be EU GDPR compliant are:

  • Companies (controllers and processors) established in the EU, regardless of whether or not the processing takes place within the EU.
  • Companies (controllers and processors) not established in the EU offering goods or services within the EU or to EU individuals.

If your XWiki-based solution is serving individuals from the EU and you - or embedded third party services like Google and Facebook - are processing any kind of personal data, you need to obtain prior consent from the visitor/user. To obtain valid consent, you need to describe the extent and purpose of your data processing in plain language to the visitor/user, prior to processing any personal data.

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How does it work?

The GDPR Cookie Consent app enables you to achieve and maintain cookie compliance. With this app you can group all cookies into specific categories, from functional to marketing ones. You can set up a pop-up that asks for your user's consent to activate or disable the cookies or trackers.

Cookies can be grouped in the following categories, depending on the different tool types:

  • necessary: cookies which are mandatory and cannot be disabled;
  • preferences: cookies or trackers which are optional and enabled by default; they are only used to remember the user preferences;
  • statistics: cookies or trackers which are optional and enabled by default; they are used to record anonymous statistics;
  • marketing: cookies or trackers which are optional and disabled by default; they can record personal information.

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Configure the Cookie Consent app from the XWiki Administration

To configure the Cookie Consent app go to the Global Administration > Other > GDPR Cookie Consent Setup.

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  • From the Administration you’ll be able to see the accepted cookies for the current user.
  • You’ll be able to configure the look (bar or square) and the content (labels, descriptions and call to actions) of the screen.
  • Most importantly you will be able to add the cookie scripts and trackers to the four categories (necessary, preferences, statistics and marketing).

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Why should I install it?

Amongst the top advantages it has, the Cookie Consent app is free to install, use and customize to match your brand identity. It integrates seamlessly with XWiki, so you can set it up and relax knowing that you crossed cookies off your GDPR to-do list.