XWiki

Category: XWiki (186 posts) [RSS]

Mar 05 2019

Meet us at Digital Workplace 2019

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Let's talk about the importance of enterprise collaborative solutions at DIGITAL WORKPLACE EXPO 2019 happening at Paris Porte de Versailles, Pavilion 4.2, between 19 - 21 March.

Who will be there?

Clément Aubin

Clément is working at XWiki SAS as an Account Manager, while also being a student at the EISTI and at Grenoble Business School. He's been involved in the free and Open Source software world since 2015 when he joined a student organization named ATILLA, that promotes free and libre alternatives to proprietary solutions. Nowadays, most of his contributions to FOSS go into the development of the XWiki Open Source software, a great project in which he's been contributing for almost a year. 

Ludovic Dubost

Creator of XWiki and CEO of XWiki SAS, Ludovic has been the gentle organizer of the XWiki SAS company for 14 years. XWiki SAS leads the development of the XWiki Software used by thousands of organizations, including Amazon Inc. and helps companies and organizations all over the world organize, share, and collaborate on content. Advanced solutions have been developed to help companies manage support content, sales procedures, and knowledge or build complete collaborative Intranets. 

Schedule

Tuesday, 19 March

HourTalkRoom
16:15 - 17:15Ludovic at The latest collaborative and conversational innovations to know in 2019Espace Topos
17:00 - 18:00Ludovic at What are the alternatives to traditional collaborative suites? What does the French Tech industry offer?Voltaire

Wednesday, 20 March

HourTalkRoom
12:00 - 12:45Ludovic at the atelier Presentation of the Inter-Administration Extranet on the Quality of Online Procedures by DINSICDumas
16:15 - 17:15Ludovic at the round table Intranet, Digital workplace, Informative and collaborative tools, Enterprise Social Networks, instant messengers, EDM: how to mix them for better work and communication? Should there be a single platform or integrated tools?Voltaire

Thursday, 21 March

HourTalkRoom
13:15 - 14:15Clément at A digital workplace always more integrated and extended: how to do it?Voltaire
14:45 - 16:15Ludovic at Embark managers in your digital workplace or intranet project over timeEspace Topos

Looking forward to meeting you all and answer all the questions you might have about XWiki, CryptPad or our community. Until then, follow us on Twitter (XWiki and CryptPad) where we will keep you up-to-date with our latest developments.

Feb 28 2019

CryptPad received the NGI award

This week, in Barcelona, Aaron and Ludovic attended the 4YFN conference to pick up CryptPad's "Privacy and trust-enhanced technologies" Startup award granted by NGI.

CryptPad is an open-source, web-based suite of collaborative editors which employs client-side cryptography to ensure that the server is not able to access the contents of users’ documents. CryptPad offers a variety of editors and other multi-user applications: rich text, code editing with syntax highlighting and markdown preview, presentations, polls for scheduling, kanbans for project management, and whiteboards for collaborative illustration.

CryptPad is being actively developed by XWiki SAS and currently funded as part of the Open PAAS NG research project, funded by BPI France. For the last 14 years, XWiki SAS has been building Open Source Collaboration Software and providing professional services allowing organizations to better organize their information.

Our promise is that CryptPad cannot spy on its users and that your data is really your data.

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Why does it matter?

It is difficult for all of us to give up powerful Internet services and software which bring us great value, but at the same time, we do not like to see how our data is being used for advertisement, political means or malicious hacking. Today this NGI Award is showing that it is possible to get our privacy back while enjoying powerful and easy to use services. We built CryptPad to show how far a team can go to empower users and increase their expectation of privacy from online services. While it was previously accepted that collaborative editing meant sacrificing confidentiality, we’ve not only proven that private editing is possible, but we’ve made our entire platform open source to ensure that this technology remains available. 

Want to be a part of this movement?

  • Use CryptPad and other Zero Knowledge services every day, tell us what you like and what we can do better.
  • Talk to your friends and colleagues about Zero Knowledge, show them CryptPad and explain that this is what the cloud can be.
  • Candidate to XWiki SAS to join our team.

Show your support

  • Buy an upgraded account from Cryptpad.fr, run by the CryptPad development team, or contribute to our Open Collective.
  • If you install the Open Source code of CryptPad on your own servers, consider buying a support contract.
  • If you’re a web developer, think about Zero Knowledge for your next web app.

About the NGI Initiative and awards

NGI is Europe’s new approach to creating a more human-centric internet. It invites citizens and communities striving for values like openness, inclusivity, transparency, privacy, cooperation, and data protection to provide input, and thus to help to guide the European Next Generation Internet funding agenda. NGI is a European Commission initiative which is being implemented by project partners throughout Europe.

The overall mission of the Next Generation Internet initiative is to re-imagine and re-engineer the Internet for the third millennium and beyond. We envision the information age will be an era that brings out the best in all of us. We want to enable human potential, mobility, and creativity at the largest possible scale – while dealing responsibly with our natural resources. In order to preserve and expand the European way of life, we shape a value-centric, human and inclusive Internet for all.

Feb 08 2019

FOSDEM 2019 and the challenge to finance Open Source

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This article was first published on Ludovic Dubost's blog.

I'm coming back from FOSDEM and it has been again an amazing year. We have been super happy to be able to run a dev room about "Collaborative Information and Content Management Applications" which has been a success  (videos are available here). We also have been able to meet XWiki and CryptPad users and give out stickers (all of them are gone and we need to reorder some for our next events). I've been happy to see that the "privacy" subject becomes more and more understood and important to the users.

While I have not been able to attend of lot of talks, beyond the dev room, I've been able to watch the videos. I use the occasion to give KUDOS to the FOSDEM video team. Their video recording system is amazing and videos are getting online with checks from speakers in a record time.

XWiki & CryptPad Talks

I'll start by recommending my talks, as well as other XWikiers:

The Challenge to finance Free and Open Source

Now what I want most to talk about is the talks about Open Source financing and the state of Open Source, as I believe that Libre and Open Source Software is having some challenges that are from my point of view growing and related to the state of the whole software industry.

I'm very happy that there are more talks that bring the subject of financing on the table, as I believe we have too much ignored the "business" aspects as "Open Source" was taking over the world through mostly the first Open Source Professional companies, Software Services companies and Cloud providers.

However while the open code was spreading everywhere, we have not fully grasped where it was coming from and how it has been financed, and today as we see less VC investment in professional open source companies, as RedHat is being acquired by IBM, and as the leading Cloud Providers are eating the business of almost all the other actors and as most future business are being developed as Cloud Services, we are starting to see a fundamental change. 

Open code continues to grow of course, especially all the infrastructure and libraries which are mostly sponsored by the cloud or SaaS actors. However there are already tentions in this area as is shown by the debates about the SSPL/Commons clause licences. The talk by Michael Cheng (working as a lawyer at Facebook, talking on his own behalf) SSPL, Confluent License, CockroachDB License and the Commons Clause - Is it freedom to choose to be less free?  when into good detail about this. It was a very good talk. Now the one thing I believe it failed to talk about was about the future of infrastructure Open Source code given the change in the market forces. While I agree that changing the licence and creating licences that effectively are trying to recreate the "proprietary software model" is not a good thing for Open Source, on the other side, if it becomes impossible to build a significant infrastructure Open Source solution as a startup, investment in Open Source code will either reduce or be only coming from the big cloud and SaaS actors and we should not expect a high percentage of Open Source investment relative to the business of these cloud providers. In the end a massive challenge for Open Source is that it represents only a small fraction of the global technology investment in the world.

Another set of talks actually discussed about direct financing of libre and open source software. I'm really happy that these talks are getting more and more common and that new solutions are emerging to help finance the developers:

Next Generation Internet

First the Next Generation Internet initiative - Year Zero - Come work for the internet on privacy, trust, search & discovery by Michiel Leenaars from NLNet presented the European Community initiatives to finance the future of the internet and in particular Open Source Code, as 12 Millions Euros are being distributed in small project between 5k and 50k to help developed "Privacy Enhancing Technologies" and "Search & Discovery". We are candidating to these funds for CryptPad, and I'm a big fan of the approach of financing smaller size projects with public money versus the big projects with many partners. I believe France and BPI should take a similar approach to fund Open Source. 

Hackers gotta eat

Kohsuke Kawaguchi from Jenkins/Cloudbees had a great talk Hackers gotta eat, Building a Company Around an Open Source Project, which touched on the business models for Open Source and why running a company alongside a project is useful and what challenges there are. I believe we have similar experiences also at XWiki which we presented last year XWiki: a case study on managing corporate and community interests - 14 years of Open Source in a Small Co. and in 2013 in the talk Combining Open Source ethics with private interests

Something I also clearly believe in, is that by structuring a company it allows to raise the level of quality and offering that the Open Source software has. In our area there are tons of wiki softwares, but only the ones with a structure can really keep up.

Crowdfunding, bounties, sponsorship programs

There has been a few talks about new financing methods:

The second talk presents GitCoin a funding mechanism using blockchain for open source code. The third one shows a great Open Source sponsorship program at INDEED where 120 K$ will be directed towards open source projects based on what is being used and voted by those who contribute. The objective, which I support, is not only to bring money but also to foster participation from inside INDEED to the projects. It is indeed (no pun intended) important to not only fund the projects but also to increase participations from the users.

The first talk gave a very good overview of different ways and new methods, including OpenCollective, GitCoin, Tidelift.

I've stolen a few slides to show them here (I hope Tobie Langel will be ok with it) because it's really important to understand this:

This is what currently OpenCollective/Tidelift have collected/committed for Open Source code:

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and this is how it compared to the Trillion dollar technology industry developer wages:

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A very good question was asked at the end of the talk about wether there is a measurement of the direct company investment in Open Source, and nobody was able to answer. It could be estimated as:

  • How much R&D is being sponsored by Open Source companies

You could use the COSSC Index of commercial open source companies (http://OSS.Cash - Google Docs) , which evaluates the revenue of these companies to 16 Billions Euros / year. Discounting a bit this revenue to 10B$, because some of these companies are not necessarily investing the massive amount of their R&D to Open Source software, and considering a 10% R&D investment, this would mean about $1B Open Source R&D.

  • How much R&D is being sponsored by Cloud providers, SaaS companies or traditional companies

If we consider the whole rest of the software industry, in the presentation above, the total wages of the developers in the world has been estimated to around 1 Trillion dollars (this is the big tower in the image).

If we look at this data from GitHub which indicates that Microsoft has 1300 contributors to OSS and Google 900. Compared to the number of engineers at Microsoft (around 60000 according to this page) and Google (37% according to these numbers in 2014 which would mean 30000 based on the current number of employees), this would mean 2% and 3% knowing that of course we don't know much about the full time nature of these contributors. We could easily estimate less than 1% for these top companies, and this would probably be much less for the rest of the tech industry.

If we consider that maybe in the best scenario, 1% of the R&D is being directed towards Open Source contributions, that would mean 10 Billions $. We could also estimate around 0,1%, which would be another $1B Open Source R&D.

  • Volunteer Time

Now the good news for Free and Open Source code is that there is the volunteer time. A study from 2014 based on hours of commit indicates that 50% of commits would be during work time versus non work time. It is not easy to validate this data, and amounts of commits, do not necessarily mean quality code. Freelancers might contribute on Open Source code outside of their paid missions, during the day. Commits might be done at the end of the day with work from the whole day. Now it's undeniable that there is non-paid Open Source contributions and according to this study it is significant. If somebody has another study of the amount of "non-paid" code, this would be very interesting. 

However, if you consider these developers have a job during the day, you can consider that their "proprietary job" is sponsoring their "evening" open source contribution.

When taking this together, if we are taking the lower estimation, it would be $2B which means the truck in the image, and in the best case $10B which would be one level of the whole tower. If we add the volunteer time on top, this could mean 2 trucks or 2 levels. I would estimate that Open Source R&D funding it's more like the truck in the image, and it's currently coming about half from Open Source companies, and half from the rest of the industry contributing. 

What is sure right now, is that not only this is very small compared to the massive amount of energy directed towards proprietary software, but the "crowdfunding" is even more microscopic compared to the "corporate" funding. 

This is why I'm worried, because looking at the evolution, it seems that we risk having less "professional open source" contributions, if VC backed companies are using non-open source licences or backing off open source, or having the "corporate" contribution become highly dependent on a consolidating industry controlling all our tech lives. The biggest risk I see, is less "professional" projects to build "end-user" applications which require a lot of fine tuning to be competitive with the cloud solutions. I don't see the cloud and internet applications provider investing in anything else than infrastructure and libraries and keeping the application and the data for themselves.

The risk, and I believe it has already started, is while we had many open source applications working on our desktop or for enterprises, while we have all the infrastructure being open source, the applications on the cloud will be controlled by proprietary providers who won't share them. We might have a lot of Open Source in the backend, but the key service is itself a proprietary service that we cannot control.

The role of developing Free and Open Source software in the sense of the FSFE.org, will remain to Open Source companies and to the vast majority of volunteers who work with almost no or little funding.

The Cloud is just another Sun

This leads me to the final talk of this FOSDEM article, The Cloud is just another Sun from Kyle Rankin from Purism (great stuff by the way). Check it out entirely because it shows a great parallel between the "Cloud Wars" and the "Unix Wars". I'm reprinting again a few slides (I hope he won't mind).

It talks to me because I do have a feeling of "déjà-vu" when looking at our the big cloud providers are dominating everything. And we all look at it thinking it's Open Source while the key aspects are being made highly proprietary. 

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What can we do?

Educate

The key question is indeed what we can do about it. We need indeed to educate again on vendor lock-in and particularly of cloud services. In Europe we already do it also because none of these big providers is actually European. As users we need to resist more the big cloud services and we need to advocate again for "Open Cloud" services, which means services that are fully Open Source.

Education is key.

Choose stronger Licences

I believe we need also stronger licences like the AGPL which pushes cloud services to contribute to the Open Source cloud services and does not allow the to fork them as proprietary softwares. I will not advocate for the SSPL licence which is pushing the limit to all the infrastructure. However a legitimate questions is how can the Open Source providers compete with Cloud providers that would contribute only marginally and sell the cloud services. As an Open Source company, the same question is showing up between those that invest in Open Source software versus those that just reuse them for profit without contributing.

However this is not an easy subject, as the stronger licence might also reduce your distribution and turn away some contributors. It is a difficult balance to find in the same way that the balance between free distribution and paying one is a difficult one.

At XWiki we have chosen to have paying modules in our app-store which are fully Open Source, but not available through install for free in the app store. If you want to use them for "free", you will need to build them yourself and run you own app-store.

Value Open Source, not the Zero price

We all confuse Open Source and Free. By doing this we push individuals or companies that try to find a balance towards "Open-Core". In the open hardware world, this is less a problem as people are used to pay for a physical object, but in the software world, we want all for free. By providing more cloud services that are "Open Cloud" we can also have a revenue stream for the cloud service and still keep the software open.

For CryptPad, this is what we are doing and many "privacy" oriented software providers are doing it this way, because it makes sense to show the code when you promise security. Now there will be a challenge to see how these services can interconnect or wether they will start competing with each other.

Finance what is not financed

We need to continue to find ways to financed what is currently not financed. We can advocate to the public funding (European for example) to finance as Open Source what is missing. This is happening with the NGI Funds for example, and us as individuals we can help more end-user projects emerge. I will make here a shameless plug for the OpenCollective of CryptPad.fr which needs your help to provide a privacy centric collaboration platform.

Kudos to the FOSDEM organizers

  • 788 talks
  • 408 hours of content
  • 600 speakers
  • 65 stands

I have to say I'm particularly impressed by the video system and the ability to validate the video of a talk and publish it in record time.

Jan 25 2019

Be Ready for FOSDEM 2019

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This year begins with one of the best conferences about free and open source software - FOSDEM. During two days experts, enthusiasts, and volunteers from all around Europe gather and share their insights into topics related to Open Source.

Over the past FOSDEM editions, we noticed that even though the event hosts plenty of developer rooms dedicated to development or infrastructure solutions, there are very few devrooms dealing with use cases impacting both technical and non-technical individuals, such as knowledge or content management.

Therefore, we have managed to create and coordinate such a room. Here's an insight into the topics that will be tackled in the Collaborative Information and Content Management Applications Devroom:

1. A Private Cloud for Everyone

Jos Poortvliet will talk about why you should care about privacy and how Nextcloud builds a private alternative for your data.

Time: 15:00 - 15:20

2. Who Needs to Know? Private-by-design collaboration

Aaron MacSween will discuss about who must have access to your data by focusing on private-by-design collaboration and CryptPad. 

Time: 15:25 - 15:45

3. Tiki: Easy Setup of Wiki-Based Knowledge Management System

Jean-Marc Libs will talk about how you can use Tiki for building up a knowledge management system.

Time: 15:50 - 16:10

4. Displaying other Application Data into a Wiki...and other Integrations

Ludovic Dubost will be there to show you how to display other application data (such as Elastic Search, Matrix/RIOT, Nagios, Cacti, JIRA, Databases) into a Wiki.

Time: 16:15 - 16:35

5. LibreOffice Online - Hosting your Documents

Michael Meeks will discuss about how you can avoid giving your documents to a large proprietary company and yet enjoy powerful collaborative editing of documents.

Time: 16:40 - 17:00

6. XWiki: a Collaborative Apps Development Platform - Build applications incrementally on top of XWiki rather than coding them from scratch

Are you planning to develop a new application from scratch? Anca Luca will explain to you how to use XWiki's features so as to assemble them in a brand-new application.

Time: 17:05 - 17:25

7. Vishkar - a CMS for Structured Content

Raja Renga Bashyam will tackle the issue of creating structured contents in a modular way.

Time: 17:30 - 17:50

8. Memex: Collaborative Web-Research

Oliver Sauter will discuss about the (im)possibility of building the perfect knowledge management tool.

Time: 17:55 - 18:15

9. CubicWeb Linked Data Browser Extension

Nicolas Chauvat will present the Web Extension that makes your browser capable of handling RDF data so that you can surf the Semantic Web and choose how data is displayed and how you interact with it.

Time: 18:20 - 18:40

10. Document Redaction with LibreOffice

Muhammet Kara will talk about preventing leakage of sensitive information by redaction in collaborative environments.

Time: 18:45 - 19:00

Moreover, if topics like Legal & Policy Issues or Design pique your curiosity, you can join Cristina DeLisle and Ecaterina Moraru in their discussions. Cristina will explain how the data protection rights are enforced by the OSS model, by analyzing some of the technologies that have risen from this ecosystem (such as Wikis), while Ecaterina will get involved into an open discussion about the difficulties that might appear when more designers contribute to Open Source projects.

See you at FOSDEM! 

You can check the entire schedule here: https://fosdem.org/2019/schedule/.

Jan 10 2019

XWiki's 2018 in review

2018 has been both challenging and rewarding at XWiki, but overall, a very productive year for us. We participated in various events, developed our products and services, received two awards for our hard work, and took great care of our team spirit.

Here is a quick revision of XWikiers` journey:

Team work makes the dream work

1. Breaking records 

In February we received the biggest reward we could have received from you, our users: an incredible increase in XWiki installs and instances activity.

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2. Amazon uses XWiki for over 1 year

The internal Wiki platform for documentation and collaboration is being used by nearly 20 000 active users, mostly in engineering and product teams, as a collaborative knowledge sharing and documentation platform. 

3. XWiki receives Best Open and Ethic Business Award 

In December we were recognized as providers of ethic software and services for over 10 years.

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4. CryptPad receives NGI startup award

Europe’s Next Generation Internet initiative (NGI.eu) awarded CryptPad the Next Generation Internet’s Privacy and trust-enhanced technologies startup award. The NGI Startup Awards recognize Europe’s most disruptive entrepreneurs who are advancing revolutionary products, solutions and services destined to have a major impact on the internet of the future.

What is new in XWiki?

1. XWiki 10.x

The 10.x cycle is defined by having an improved usability for on-boarding new users and administrators: from protection against refactoring operations, to editing inline macro content, to more auto-suggests, to a faster user interface. We managed to have over 750 issues closed: 415 bugs, 160 improvements, 31 new features and more!

2. ONLYOFFICE online editors added to XWiki`s ecosystem

Users can perform all their editing tasks directly in XWiki without having to switch between the editor and their collaboration software anymore. Furthermore, multiple users can collaborate in real time and push changes directly to XWiki.

3. XWiki Cloud free for Open Source Projects

Open source projects requesting a cloud wiki, can host their wikis with XWiki SAS at the bronze level and receive regular updates.

4. GDPR compliance with XWiki`s cookies consent application

In light of the latest European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), our team created a Cookies Consent application to help XWiki users ensure compliance. It can be installed for free and customized in such a way that it matches each brand`s identity.

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XWiki at conferences

We've been more active than ever in the international conferences and meetings scene. Whether in France, Belgium, Romania or the United States of America, our team made sure we are well represented.

1. FOSDEM 

We participated with presentations in six different tracks, tackling various hot subjects: new features, compatibility and integration with other tools and services, lessons learned from deployments, surveys, research and development, legal issues, and Artificial Intelligence.

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2. Salon Intranet

Ludovic, our CEO, had 4 talks about collaboration and wiki culture. 

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3. OW2 Meetup

At the beginning of June, we hosted a user meetup within the OW2 conference. It was a great occasion to see and meet people from the corporate and Open Source world interested in the use cases of XWiki.

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4. Libre Software Meeting

Our participating XWikiers, Clément Aubin, Ludovic Dubost and Anca Luca discussed about building a customized knowledge base in minutes, tips and tricks to finance free software, CryptPad - the Zero Knowledge editor, and Open Food Facts.

5. Hackathon in San Francisco

Ludovic, Anca, and Clement held a presentation about CryptPad, our end-to-end encrypted real-time collaboration tool. Also, they took part in a hackathon on CryptPad and XWiki.

6. Cloud Expo  Europe

We met plenty of you at our stand and discussed about digital transformation problems linked to cloud and encrypted collaboration solutions.

7. Day Click

Our HR Team met potential candidates and shared our job openings and internship opportunities with them.

8. B-Boost Convention

Ludovic took part in the round table discussion on Open Source and free models. It was a great opportunity to exchange on security topics and CryptPad, too.

9. Capitol du Libre 2018 

Ludovic brought to discussion the topic of financing free and open source software and described how collaboration with end-to-end encryption is possible using CryptPad.

10. Paris Open Source Summit 2018

We presented during the following tracks: Increasing ethics in Digital, End-user Solutions for the Workplace, Open Source Community Summit and European Open Source Law Event.

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Team life

1. XWiki Seminar 

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Both teams from France and Romania had a great time together in Brasov. The theme chosen for this year was about the topic of “bears”, considering the mountain location. 

2. Breakfast @XWiki on International Week of Happiness at Work

Armed with smiley badges, colorful balloons and inspired by the emblematic "Breakfast at Tiffany's" theme, we organized an early breakfast in Iasi and Paris, at the same time.

3. Women in Tech

PIN Magazine published an article about how in XWiki (Iasi) women proved that they can work in IT and even outnumber their male colleagues.   

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How was your 2018?

Dec 21 2018

XWiki receives Best Open and Ethic Business Award

XWiki Best Ethic Business Award

ethic 

1. (noun) a set of moral principles, especially ones relating to or affirming a specified group, field, or form of conduct.

2. (adjective) relating to moral principles or the branch of knowledge dealing with these.

We are happy, humbled and privileged to be recognized as providers of ethic software and services, award given by CNLL - the Union of Companies of Free Software and Open Digital. We've been thinking about the meaning of this title - Best Open and Ethic Business - since the day of the awards ceremony, as it seems to follow us through the years. In 2013, OWcon awarded us with the Technology Council Special Prize for our ethical approach of doing business and for complying with the best Open Source practices.

What is it that makes us ethic, you might wonder. Here is a sum up of the values that we've followed for 15 years and why they are important to us:

Transparency

We think that transparency is the key to working on an open source project and it is fundamental to boost collaboration among different project members.

Openness

We believe in open standards, open protocols and formats, and open source as a more efficient way of developing, operating and integrating software solutions.

Collaboration

We are open to any party that wants to collaborate with us, whether they are individuals, companies or institutions. We strongly believe in using cooperative ways of building business solutions.

Meritocracy

We believe we should gain people's respect and recognition due to our work. We shall always make sure that everybody has access to our open resources on an equal basis and we will accept contributors based on the merit of their work and their skills.

Leadership

We lead the XWiki projects, empowering our community through the coordination and management of processes instead of exercising them through authority.

Excellence

We put maximum effort, dedication and care in everything that we do. We always strive for excellence.

Gratitude

We are grateful for the active involvement and interest of our community and for every contribution that we receive, regardless of origin, motivation, size and type.

We are happy to have this award join the one CryptPad received in November for being the “Best Startup for Privacy and Trust-Enhanced Technologies”.

2018 was a challenging but extremely rewarding year and we want to thank you for trusting our solutions and team. Looking forward to the see what 2019 has prepared for us emoticon_wink 

Dec 13 2018

XWiki @Paris Open Source Summit 2018

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Our team of brave XWikiers did it again! We`ve represented XWiki and CryptPad at Paris Open Source Summit 2018, event that got to its 4th edition. Between the 5th & 6th of December, 5000 participants had the occasion to attend around 200 conferences and get in touch with the latest technological innovations.

Our colleagues tackled four main topics during the conference: XWiki Solutions, CryptPad, GDPR, and Open Food Facts. Moreover, as a token of all the hard work in the past 15 years, we received the “Best Open and Ethic Business” award.

XWiki Solutions

Ludovic, our CEO, conducted a track on End-user Solutions for the Workplace. Providers such as Bluemind, Maarch, XWiki, eXoPlatform, ElasticSearch, Tuleap, BonitaSoft, SpagoBI, and RocketChat offered an insight into their solutions for Collaboration, Chat, Big-Data or Document Management.

In the same track, Clément, our Account Manager, had a speech on how the open source XWiki software developed, and how companies like SCOR, SNCF, SFR, Naval Group, Fidelia, ARS Hauts de France benefit from XWiki SAS solutions. Find out more about this topic by reading his presentation:

CryptPad

During the Summit, Ludovic had two important roles: he was both a trackleader and a speaker. His intervention as a speaker was focused on CryptPad and the need of a new approach for collaboration services based on end-to-end  encryption and zero-knowledge of user`s data in cloud services. Take a closer look at his presentation:

Aaron, who is the CryptPad CTO and part of the XWiki Research Team, held a presentation called CryptPad, Encrypted Collaboration, tackling the same issue as Ludovic`s: providing both the highest security of user`s data and real-time collaboration. For further details, read his presentation:

GDPR

Cristina, our DPO, had an intervention on the implementation of GDPR in IT companies by bringing to participants` attention some epic fails and XWiki`s example of good practice on enforcement of data protection measures. Check out the entire presentation below:

Open Food Facts

If you joined the Co-producing a free database round-table, you might have met Anca, our Client Service CTO, who debated about the new concepts of Open Data.

To sum up our experience, we had a blast during these two days. Meeting new people, establishing new connections, and impacting the Open Source Community made us look forward to next year`s edition.

Anamaria Aniculăesei - XWiki Marketing Intern

Dec 11 2018

XWiki at Capitol du Libre 2018

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The past few weeks have been busy with multiple events we have attended - Capitole du Libre, Cloud Expo Europe Paris, Paris Open Source Summit - and our blog was on a brief hiatus. Worry not, as we are back with updates and some great news we are excited to share. 

Capitol du Libre is a weekend long event dedicated to free software that took place in Toulouse, France, between 17 & 18 November. It’s an event open to all audiences, with a wide variety of themes, activities and workshops. Ludovic, Anca and Clement attended it and tell us that it was a great experience and shared the experience of meeting so many open source aficionados.

If you didn’t make it, here’s a sneak peek of the talks of the event and, below, the talks Ludovic and Clement had.

We often hear that Open Source has won. Is this really the case? In this presentation, Ludovic showed that while Open-Source is now the code leader for many software, there is still software and services that are not available as free software, including many cloud services. Your data is always controlled by proprietary software and algorithms built on a large amount of open-source code. Why is this the case and what can the free and open source software community do to improve this situation? Find out how open business models and free software funding should evolve to enable more free and open source code in all areas.

Cloud services are increasingly used and your data is increasingly exposed. Even though cloud services "promise" to keep your data secure, you do not actually control what is put in place to keep your data and privacy secure. Many cloud services use your data to build advertising-based business models that read data and transfer it to advertising services. In this presentation, Ludovic demonstrated why a new approach is needed for collaboration software and services, based on end-to-end encryption and zero-knowledge by the cloud service. He showcased this approach implemented in the free project CryptPad.

When working in teams on a project, we often observe that people don't choose to use very collaborative solutions for their work. Documents get scattered across multiple folders or in emails, it gets hard to distinguish an old version of a document from a new one, and we miss the possibility to link documents between each others. Clement presented some of the most popular features proposed by XWiki to adapt the platform to company use cases and how XWiki can help any individual or team to build a knowledge base adapted to his needs. 

See you next year?

Oct 30 2018

XWiki and its Women in Tech

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This article originally appeared in PIN magazine.

XWiki is an organization active in the open source domain, offering its own product: a software used to build collaborative solutions and services. The company was founded in 2004 in France and since 2007 in Romania as well. At the time of publication of this article, our team consists of 39 employees split between the Paris and Iasi offices. Diversity in the workplace is important to us, and it came naturally, because we have always sought to hire the best person, regardless of age, gender, religion or any other external factor. With regard to gender distribution, the difference between the percentage of female and male employees is not significant in the company itself. The statistics for the Iasi office are, however, more interesting: the number of women considerably exceeds that of men.

We asked our female colleagues for testimonials on their experience in the IT world, from the point of view of their professional activity, but also from a personal point of view.

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Ecaterina Moraru - Lead Interaction Designer

I am one of the few high school colleagues who have ended up working in this field. I remember that when I was accepted into the Faculty of Computer Science, there were just a few girls taking the same courses, with the gender difference already marking this field. Besides, if you were passionate about gaming, you were even more rare. Today, things have changed quite a bit.

At XWiki, I'm an Interaction Designer. Even if what I do may seem a little "soft", I consider it a best choice, as it's a place a come to work with great enthusiasm. In Iasi, the field of Interaction Design and the entire area of User Experience are still in the beginning phase. I cannot say I had someone that I was able to learn from, but I believe I was able to find and implement solutions that made the software more accessible and easy to use.

XWiki was the first company in Iasi to develop an open source product and, even today, it is one of the few companies built around this philosophy. I always had this desire to contribute to the creation of a product, and now I'm part of the team in charge of developing the open source product. I take care of the specifications and interface of the new functionalities which we want to integrate into the product. I create prototypes and write code for the front-end. I collaborate with our international community and we decide together about the functionalities that would be implemented. The product I have been developing and contributing to for more than 10 years has more than 3 million downloads and users in more than 115 countries.

Instead of a conclusion, I consider that women can learn and work in any IT specialization. In addition, you have the opportunity to act and develop not only locally, but globally. There are now many projects and companies that promote gender diversity and encourage women to pursue a career in IT. Nevertheless, I believe that the power of example is the most powerful motivation: the more women who work in this field and talk about their experience, the more they will attract others who will want the same thing.

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Cristina DeLisle - Office and Legal Administrator, DPO

I studied law with a specialization in Business Law, and I currently work at XWiki in the Paris office, after spending a year in the Iasi office.

My role is a combination of cross-functional skills, in areas such as human resources, law, data protection, accounting, technology sales - all because XWiki, my employer, is an open source company. The majority of my colleagues have a specialization in computer science and are professionals in this field, but other employee skills are also appreciated within XWiki.

I had the chance to meet great colleagues at XWiki, who inspire me to explore the technical side and go beyond my limits. I had the opportunity to participate and speak at IT conferences, where, considering gender differences, I found myself at a presentation where there were only men in the audience. It was one of the moments when I realized the disparity in the industry or sectors of the industry.

Fortunately, this problem does not exist at XWiki - almost half of the employees are women (including in management positions) - as well as there is no gender-based discrimination. I would like to find this model in general, in all IT companies.

I think it is important that there are examples of women who have made careers, in general, to find them in executive and leadership roles. The challenge is to ensure a balance between this model and meritocracy, which in most cases brings men into the recruitment process who are finalized with an offer. Moreover, gender discrimination in IT seems to be a real problem, if we take into account analyses that, fortunately, I have just read and not experienced from a personal point of view. I am happy to have women I admire on my team and I believe that such examples will ensure, over time, a numerical balance between the sexes in the technical field.

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Diana Veron - HR and Admin Coordinator

I had the opportunity to enter the IT industry in 2011, just after completing a Master's degree in Human Resources Management at the Faculty of Economics and Business Management, by obtaining a position as HR and Admin Assistant at XWiki. I have always dreamed of working in HR in the IT industry, because the challenges in this field (especially related to the recruitment process and employee motivation) have always attracted me. What I found at XWiki fully met my expectations: the work environment, the young and dynamic team, the international aspect and the way we communicate, the flexibility of the work schedule, the autonomy and the trust the management and my colleagues invested in me, the relationship with them, etc.

Even if, usually, in the field of HR we see mostly women, I had the opportunity to work also with men having this role at XWiki, and in my experience, gender is not a concern at all. As a member of the XWiki Executive Committee, I have always felt that my opinion counts and is taken into consideration, I am only satisfied because I have had the opportunity to contribute to strategic decision-making within the company. For me HR and the IT industry will always remain key aspects in my professional career and I am proud to lead my activity in such a rapidly changing industry.

IT is a dynamic industry and I have encountered challenges everywhere, but in my opinion the secret to success lies in the passionate performance of tasks and in being in the right professional environment, with the right team. Of course, there is also determination, curiosity, continuous learning and concentration of effort to achieve a high quality mission.

This year I became a mother, and I added new challenges to my current activity: I moved to France, started working remotely, and I am constantly working to maintain a balance between family and professional life. One of the major differences between Romania and France is the fact that, after the birth of the first child, mothers must be back at work immediately after maternity leave, which is only 4 months.

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Oana Lavinia Florean - Software Development Intern

I graduated the Computer Science high school, Grigore Moisil in Iasi, currently studying in the third year at the Faculty of Computer Science and I have been an intern at XWiki for 5 months. I therefore have experience strongly related to the IT field and contrary to what is said, I have not observed a great discrepancy between the number of women and men in the field.

At XWiki, I had my first internship, my first experience in a company, which gave me the opportunity to interact with the open source environment. I was part of the team that developed the open source product and had the opportunity to get in touch with a less well-known IT sub-domain in Romania. I collaborated with people from different countries, I have seen my contributions integrated into new versions of the product and I have improved, at the same time, my developer skills.

We do have the coolest colleagues, isn't it?

Oct 10 2018

Join our hackathon in San Francisco

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As some of you might already know from our tweets, Ludovic, Anca and Clement will be travelling to San Francisco between the 12th and the 20th of October. They're looking forward to meeting contributors and friends from the area, so let them, or us, know if you want to grab a coffee and exchange ideas.

Moreover, if you want to roll up your sleeves, you can join them at the hackathon hosted by Noisebridge, on Saturday, 20 October. The event will start with a presentation about CryptPad, our end-to-end encrypted realtime collaboration tool, followed by the hackathon on CryptPad and XWiki, the open source software.
The host will be Steve Phillips, creator of CrypTag & Cypherpunks Write Code and lead developer of LeapChat. Noisebridge is a hackerspace for technical-creative projects, doocratically run by its members. They are a non-profit educational institution intended for public benefit. Located in the heart of San Francisco, their motto is: We teach, we learn, we share. 

Agenda (12 p.m. - 6 p.m.):

12 p.m. - Opening and introductions

1 p.m. - CryptPad presentation: "Why Privacy Matters and How to Collaborate Securely"
Ludovic Dubost, CEO of XWiki SAS, the company that is building the CryptPad open source project and online service, will tell us what went on when the idea of Cryptpad came about, how it was developed and what possibilities this new technology brings.

1:45 p.m. - CryptPad and XWiki Hackathon
This is an event for any developer that wishes to work on an open source software. You can help enhance CryptPad and XWiki, try to build your first privacy enhancing application and, for the perfectionist bunch, fix a bug in CryptPad or XWiki.
We're officially launching a challenge for the advanced developers: to integrate a JavaScript calendar viewer and editor inside CryptPad. Signed up yet?


Who will be there?

- Ludovic Dubost: creator of XWiki and CryptPad contributor, business lead of XWiki & CryptPad;
- Anca Luca: 10 year XWiki committer and XWiki Client team CTO;
- Clément Aubin: XWiki committer & Google Summer of Code Mentor;
- Steve Phillips: creator of CrypTag & Cypherpunks Write Code + lead developer of LeapChat;
- You!

 See you in San Francisco?