XWiki

Category: XWiki (201 posts) [RSS]

Jun 11 2019

Join us for the OW2'19 XWiki Meetup

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We’re hosting an XWiki Meetup at OW2 conference, in Paris, with talks from our clients at France Mobilités.

What is the XWiki Meetup?

The XWiki Meetup is a great opportunity to interact with the people developing XWiki and the ones that have chosen it for their information intelligence needs. Even more, we want to learn what future features you would like to see in XWiki, so we will launch a debate in which you can decide the future of XWiki. Exciting, isn't it?

Also, as the meetup it’s part of a larger event, you can meet lots of other interesting people and talks at the conference. See the full schedule here. OW2con'19 is the annual open source event bringing together the OW2 community, technology experts, software architects, IT project managers and decision-makers from around the world.

This Break-out Session, XWiki will:

- present the latest features in XWiki and enhancements brought by the newest versions;
- organize a Q&A/brainstorming session on new features for the XWiki ecosystem - let us know what you want to implement next;
- share testimonials from XWiki users regarding their daily experience with the product.

Who will be there?

Vincent Massol - CTO of XWiki SAS and an active committer of the XWiki open source project

Clément Aubin - Account Manager at XWiki SAS and an active committer of the XWiki open source project

Where and when will it be?

The Meetup will take place on Thursday, the 13th of June 2019 at Orange Gardens Hello Lab, between 9:15 AM - 10:45 AM.

See you there?

Jun 10 2019

How to Organize a Company Retreat

At XWiki, we are strong believers in flexibility, so we trust our team to choose when and where they can do their best work. Consequently, our team is distributed across multiple countries, with people working both from our offices and remotely.

A downside is that we need to make a conscious effort if we want to get everybody together in the same place. We regularly have colleagues traveling to our two offices, but the way we get everyone in the same spot is by organizing a team retreat once a year.

As we’re working on our 11th global get-together we thought it would be nice to share how we go about planning it and how we use tools to stay organized and on track.

The prep

Our retreat usually lasts about a week, with two days dedicated to travel. Starting January we create a detailed plan and budget for our retreat. We also like to build our own app to make sure it fits our specific needs. Once the groundwork is done, we start looking for the perfect time and setting.

Finding the perfect location

We begin every new year by scouting for the perfect location, get in touch with hotels and resorts that we think might be a good fit. In parallel, we run a poll on our intranet checking our team’s availability. Once we save the date and come up with the locations shortlist, we create a new poll and ask our team to vote for their favorite place.

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Transportation arrangements

As soon as we sign the contract with the location we start making the transportation arrangements. We try to have the team travel together as much as possible, but we also accommodate colleagues who travel from other locations or who wish to stay longer or less. Everyone receives their ticket by email and we have a page on our intranet where we put all the travel information. We always try to pick locations that are reasonably easy to get to.

Preparing the sessions

With most of the logistics taken care of, two months prior to the event, we start prepping the sessions and other on-site activities. Anyone at XWiki can use the dedicated Seminar app to propose talks they’d like to organize or participate in.
By now you’ve guessed we are big fans of polls at XWiki. We love using them to make decisions as a team. Whenever we have too many proposals, we launch a vote to pick the most interesting sessions.
Once we have the final schedule, we feature it on our intranet calendar and sync it with Google Calendar. We also export the schedule as a PDF, so people may use it offline should they wish.

Food, trip, and other fun activities

A large extent of our efforts goes towards planning the day trip, party, and team building activities. Much of the time on site though is spent hanging out, playing games and getting to know each other better.
One of the highlights of the retreat is the hackathon. It provides the perfect opportunity for all of us to work together in person. Anyone can suggest topics and the remaining colleagues will join one of the proposed ideas. Hackathon teams work on their projects throughout the day and get to present the results in the afternoon.
In terms of catering, we try to select a buffet menu that is diverse and satisfies varied tastes and dietary restrictions. Once we have collected team feedback and agreed on the final menu with the location, we share it with everyone.

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Goodies

No company retreat is complete without geeky T-Shirts and goodies. We come up with a custom logo for each retreat. Everyone can send a proposal. The most voted logo is then proudly worn on our t-shirts.

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Less fun, but equally important: keeping track of finances

All through the event prep, we make sure to regularly update our budget and expenses. To stay organized we upload all contracts, invoices, and tickets to our wiki and use livetables to filter and sort documents.

Feedback

At XWiki, we love giving and receiving feedback. As we aim to make retreats better every year, after each event we run an internal survey to see what went well and what could be improved.

That’s about it! Organizing a team retreat is no easy feat for our HR team, but it’s always worth it. As we’re writing this post, we’re in the last stages of planning our next seminar, which takes place in exactly one month from now. We’ll be starting out in Paris, then traveling to the Loire Valley. Looking forward to another good one and we’ll make sure to come back with updates!

Silvia Macovei, Head of Cloud Business

May 21 2019

Five things successful remote teams share

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This article was first published on LinkedIn

More and more companies are starting to work in distributed teams, as they’re looking to reach a global pool of talent and service clients in multiple time zones. Working across geographical boundaries and time zones can become a competitive advantage when you’re trying to reach a global audience, but it also comes with challenges. In this piece, we explore five things successful distributed teams share.

1. Tools for the digital workplace

In a remote setting, communication is key. Relying solely on email is not efficient. With team members and clients spread across different timezones, your inbox will quickly fill up with messages, making it hard to stay eloquent, organized and productive. Your team will likely rely on different tools to get work done and for day to day interactions. Both synchronous and asynchronous communication are important.

Tools like Slack, Matrix, XWiki, GitHub, GitLab, Jira offer a convenient way to store knowledge, work on projects and keep in touch with your team.

Non-verbal cues give us context. Without them, it’s easy to misinterpret the text. So you’ll likely also be using solutions like Zoom or Hangouts for video and voice meetings.

An eSignature tool will often help you avoid the hassle of scanning or sending physical documents back and forth.

2. Trust & transparency

When hiring for a distributed team you’ll want to work with people who have a track record of getting things done. Trust is essential, when you’re not sharing the same office with your colleagues and results are not measured by the number of hours spent in the office. With trust, comes the responsibility of getting things done.

Accountability is built on trust and trust is built on transparency. In an open and transparent culture, people can communicate freely and enjoy quick access to the information they need to get their best work done.

Many teams favor an agile approach, where each team member posts what they’ve accomplished that week, what they’ll be working on next week, as well as any issues they’ve come across.

3. Processes

Good processes are important for providing structure and not reinventing the wheel. However, processes should not be rigid or set in stone, blocking innovation (aka “we’ve always done it this way”).

4. Core hours

When you’re working across multiple time zones, most work hours will not overlap. Some core hours might be useful though to easily organize meetings and resolve urgent matters.

5. Face time

Successful distributed teams regularly have all hands and team meetings, as well as one-on-one talks to align on the company and career goals. Recording meetings is often a good idea, so team members who couldn’t join the live events may be able to check them out.

Direct, personal interactions are also extremely valuable. Many companies have regular retreats where the whole team get together to better know each other, work on projects, have fun and celebrate their accomplishments. Smaller teams might also have their own trips to align and work together.

In the end, companies find their own recipes for working in distributed teams, with the best ones building unique cultures along the way.

What are some of your tips?

Silvia Macovei, Head of Cloud Business

May 15 2019

Why choose an Open Source solution for your company

If you are the decision-maker for a startup or a large company, you count on people, employees or collaborators to create value for your customers. For that to happen, they need quick access to the right information at any given time. In our mobile-centric world, the collaborative solutions you choose will dictate the success of your business. You need a solution to organize your knowledge, communicate with various teams, and with the clients spread around the world.

Why choose a collaborative solution in lieu of traditional communication means? Information is getting lost in email threads, exposed to undesired audiences, or placed chaotically in documents that go back and forward. Your business is suffering when you and your collaborators don't have the right information or the solution required by the client. 

Ludovic Dubost, the Founder of XWiki and CEO of XWiki SAS, discussed with EFFORST on solutions for modern companies, for those decision-makers that want to scale business in a healthy way. 


Are our solutions right for you?

Are you struggling with information management and organization? XWiki has been built to help companies with knowledge organizing and sharing (with solutions as Intranet, Extranet, Digital Workplace, Knowledge Base and custom projects), ready to adapt to the specifics of your company and processes.

Do you and your online collaborators wish for an encrypted, private editing tool that provides total control in terms of the content and documents you are working on? CryptPad makes this possible with a web-based suite of editors that use encryption to provide private collaborative editing. Share text, code, presentations, polls, todo lists, kanbans and many more.

Our team is ready to offer professional services to help your company implement and tailor tools that answer to your needs. emoticon_smile

Apr 08 2019

Building a powerful knowledge base with XWiki Pro

Collaboration tools are enabling both large and small businesses to digitalize and transform their operations.

At XWiki, we help companies centralize and organize their information, so knowledge doesn’t get lost and teams work better together.

If you’re looking to go one step further in your knowledge management journey you don't want to miss out on XWiki Pro, a full set of apps that will extend the standard platform to improve productivity and achieve clarity across your organization. 

XWiki Pro addresses three key challenges that companies share:

  • fostering collaboration and aligning teams;

  • displaying and organizing information, in the best and most efficient way;

  • integrating with other tools, so everything remains accessible from one place.

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When it comes to boosting team collaboration and transparency, the Calendar app is an excellent choice to keep up with events, while team meetings can be planned using the dedicated app. The Forum app encourages conversations and knowledge sharing between team members, while the Ideas application offers the perfect setting for fostering innovation.

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The second set of apps addresses your needs for creating and organizing content. The File Manager can be used to manage files inside the wiki. With the Diagram app, you’ll be able to enrich your content and create various types of diagrams straight from your wiki pages.

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We know that teams can use lots of other different tools to create and manage content. Depending on your specific needs, you can also work seamlessly with integrations such as Office365, Google Apps, OnlyOffice, Active Directory.

XWiki Pro is not only about apps though. It’s also about real support, performed by real people. Our team of experts is ready to guide you through each step of your XWiki journey.

Last, but not least, your contributions to XWiki Pro go towards building and improving the XWiki open source product and applications.

If you’re a technical support customer or a cloud user, you already have access to XWiki Pro starting with the Silver level.

XWiki offers a great way to create and organize information. Using structured data and XWiki Pro you can go a step further in adapting knowledge management to your needs, implementing a tool that is completely customized for your organization.

To try it out, search for XWiki Pro in your wiki's Extension Manager, then install the app and get the trial.

Silvia Macovei, Head of Cloud Business
 

Mar 05 2019

Meet us at Digital Workplace 2019

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Let's talk about the importance of enterprise collaborative solutions at DIGITAL WORKPLACE EXPO 2019 happening at Paris Porte de Versailles, Pavilion 4.2, between 19 - 21 March.

Who will be there?

Clément Aubin

Clément is working at XWiki SAS as an Account Manager, while also being a student at the EISTI and at Grenoble Business School. He's been involved in the free and Open Source software world since 2015 when he joined a student organization named ATILLA, that promotes free and libre alternatives to proprietary solutions. Nowadays, most of his contributions to FOSS go into the development of the XWiki Open Source software, a great project in which he's been contributing for almost a year. 

Ludovic Dubost

Creator of XWiki and CEO of XWiki SAS, Ludovic has been the gentle organizer of the XWiki SAS company for 14 years. XWiki SAS leads the development of the XWiki Software used by thousands of organizations, including Amazon Inc. and helps companies and organizations all over the world organize, share, and collaborate on content. Advanced solutions have been developed to help companies manage support content, sales procedures, and knowledge or build complete collaborative Intranets. 

Schedule

Tuesday, 19 March

HourTalkRoom
16:15 - 17:15Ludovic at The latest collaborative and conversational innovations to know in 2019Espace Topos
17:00 - 18:00Ludovic at What are the alternatives to traditional collaborative suites? What does the French Tech industry offer?Voltaire

Wednesday, 20 March

HourTalkRoom
12:00 - 12:45Ludovic at the atelier Presentation of the Inter-Administration Extranet on the Quality of Online Procedures by DINSICDumas
16:15 - 17:15Ludovic at the round table Intranet, Digital workplace, Informative and collaborative tools, Enterprise Social Networks, instant messengers, EDM: how to mix them for better work and communication? Should there be a single platform or integrated tools?Voltaire

Thursday, 21 March

HourTalkRoom
13:15 - 14:15Clément at A digital workplace always more integrated and extended: how to do it?Voltaire
14:45 - 16:15Ludovic at Embark managers in your digital workplace or intranet project over timeEspace Topos

Looking forward to meeting you all and answer all the questions you might have about XWiki, CryptPad or our community. Until then, follow us on Twitter (XWiki and CryptPad) where we will keep you up-to-date with our latest developments.

Feb 28 2019

CryptPad received the NGI award

This week, in Barcelona, Aaron and Ludovic attended the 4YFN conference to pick up CryptPad's "Privacy and trust-enhanced technologies" Startup award granted by NGI.

CryptPad is an open-source, web-based suite of collaborative editors which employs client-side cryptography to ensure that the server is not able to access the contents of users’ documents. CryptPad offers a variety of editors and other multi-user applications: rich text, code editing with syntax highlighting and markdown preview, presentations, polls for scheduling, kanbans for project management, and whiteboards for collaborative illustration.

CryptPad is being actively developed by XWiki SAS and currently funded as part of the Open PAAS NG research project, funded by BPI France. For the last 14 years, XWiki SAS has been building Open Source Collaboration Software and providing professional services allowing organizations to better organize their information.

Our promise is that CryptPad cannot spy on its users and that your data is really your data.

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Why does it matter?

It is difficult for all of us to give up powerful Internet services and software which bring us great value, but at the same time, we do not like to see how our data is being used for advertisement, political means or malicious hacking. Today this NGI Award is showing that it is possible to get our privacy back while enjoying powerful and easy to use services. We built CryptPad to show how far a team can go to empower users and increase their expectation of privacy from online services. While it was previously accepted that collaborative editing meant sacrificing confidentiality, we’ve not only proven that private editing is possible, but we’ve made our entire platform open source to ensure that this technology remains available. 

Want to be a part of this movement?

  • Use CryptPad and other Zero Knowledge services every day, tell us what you like and what we can do better.
  • Talk to your friends and colleagues about Zero Knowledge, show them CryptPad and explain that this is what the cloud can be.
  • Candidate to XWiki SAS to join our team.

Show your support

  • Buy an upgraded account from Cryptpad.fr, run by the CryptPad development team, or contribute to our Open Collective.
  • If you install the Open Source code of CryptPad on your own servers, consider buying a support contract.
  • If you’re a web developer, think about Zero Knowledge for your next web app.

About the NGI Initiative and awards

NGI is Europe’s new approach to creating a more human-centric internet. It invites citizens and communities striving for values like openness, inclusivity, transparency, privacy, cooperation, and data protection to provide input, and thus to help to guide the European Next Generation Internet funding agenda. NGI is a European Commission initiative which is being implemented by project partners throughout Europe.

The overall mission of the Next Generation Internet initiative is to re-imagine and re-engineer the Internet for the third millennium and beyond. We envision the information age will be an era that brings out the best in all of us. We want to enable human potential, mobility, and creativity at the largest possible scale – while dealing responsibly with our natural resources. In order to preserve and expand the European way of life, we shape a value-centric, human and inclusive Internet for all.

Feb 08 2019

FOSDEM 2019 and the challenge to finance Open Source

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This article was first published on Ludovic Dubost's blog.

I'm coming back from FOSDEM and it has been again an amazing year. We have been super happy to be able to run a dev room about "Collaborative Information and Content Management Applications" which has been a success  (videos are available here). We also have been able to meet XWiki and CryptPad users and give out stickers (all of them are gone and we need to reorder some for our next events). I've been happy to see that the "privacy" subject becomes more and more understood and important to the users.

While I have not been able to attend of lot of talks, beyond the dev room, I've been able to watch the videos. I use the occasion to give KUDOS to the FOSDEM video team. Their video recording system is amazing and videos are getting online with checks from speakers in a record time.

XWiki & CryptPad Talks

I'll start by recommending my talks, as well as other XWikiers:

The Challenge to finance Free and Open Source

Now what I want most to talk about is the talks about Open Source financing and the state of Open Source, as I believe that Libre and Open Source Software is having some challenges that are from my point of view growing and related to the state of the whole software industry.

I'm very happy that there are more talks that bring the subject of financing on the table, as I believe we have too much ignored the "business" aspects as "Open Source" was taking over the world through mostly the first Open Source Professional companies, Software Services companies and Cloud providers.

However while the open code was spreading everywhere, we have not fully grasped where it was coming from and how it has been financed, and today as we see less VC investment in professional open source companies, as RedHat is being acquired by IBM, and as the leading Cloud Providers are eating the business of almost all the other actors and as most future business are being developed as Cloud Services, we are starting to see a fundamental change. 

Open code continues to grow of course, especially all the infrastructure and libraries which are mostly sponsored by the cloud or SaaS actors. However there are already tentions in this area as is shown by the debates about the SSPL/Commons clause licences. The talk by Michael Cheng (working as a lawyer at Facebook, talking on his own behalf) SSPL, Confluent License, CockroachDB License and the Commons Clause - Is it freedom to choose to be less free?  when into good detail about this. It was a very good talk. Now the one thing I believe it failed to talk about was about the future of infrastructure Open Source code given the change in the market forces. While I agree that changing the licence and creating licences that effectively are trying to recreate the "proprietary software model" is not a good thing for Open Source, on the other side, if it becomes impossible to build a significant infrastructure Open Source solution as a startup, investment in Open Source code will either reduce or be only coming from the big cloud and SaaS actors and we should not expect a high percentage of Open Source investment relative to the business of these cloud providers. In the end a massive challenge for Open Source is that it represents only a small fraction of the global technology investment in the world.

Another set of talks actually discussed about direct financing of libre and open source software. I'm really happy that these talks are getting more and more common and that new solutions are emerging to help finance the developers:

Next Generation Internet

First the Next Generation Internet initiative - Year Zero - Come work for the internet on privacy, trust, search & discovery by Michiel Leenaars from NLNet presented the European Community initiatives to finance the future of the internet and in particular Open Source Code, as 12 Millions Euros are being distributed in small project between 5k and 50k to help developed "Privacy Enhancing Technologies" and "Search & Discovery". We are candidating to these funds for CryptPad, and I'm a big fan of the approach of financing smaller size projects with public money versus the big projects with many partners. I believe France and BPI should take a similar approach to fund Open Source. 

Hackers gotta eat

Kohsuke Kawaguchi from Jenkins/Cloudbees had a great talk Hackers gotta eat, Building a Company Around an Open Source Project, which touched on the business models for Open Source and why running a company alongside a project is useful and what challenges there are. I believe we have similar experiences also at XWiki which we presented last year XWiki: a case study on managing corporate and community interests - 14 years of Open Source in a Small Co. and in 2013 in the talk Combining Open Source ethics with private interests

Something I also clearly believe in, is that by structuring a company it allows to raise the level of quality and offering that the Open Source software has. In our area there are tons of wiki softwares, but only the ones with a structure can really keep up.

Crowdfunding, bounties, sponsorship programs

There has been a few talks about new financing methods:

The second talk presents GitCoin a funding mechanism using blockchain for open source code. The third one shows a great Open Source sponsorship program at INDEED where 120 K$ will be directed towards open source projects based on what is being used and voted by those who contribute. The objective, which I support, is not only to bring money but also to foster participation from inside INDEED to the projects. It is indeed (no pun intended) important to not only fund the projects but also to increase participations from the users.

The first talk gave a very good overview of different ways and new methods, including OpenCollective, GitCoin, Tidelift.

I've stolen a few slides to show them here (I hope Tobie Langel will be ok with it) because it's really important to understand this:

This is what currently OpenCollective/Tidelift have collected/committed for Open Source code:

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and this is how it compared to the Trillion dollar technology industry developer wages:

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A very good question was asked at the end of the talk about wether there is a measurement of the direct company investment in Open Source, and nobody was able to answer. It could be estimated as:

  • How much R&D is being sponsored by Open Source companies

You could use the COSSC Index of commercial open source companies (http://OSS.Cash - Google Docs) , which evaluates the revenue of these companies to 16 Billions Euros / year. Discounting a bit this revenue to 10B$, because some of these companies are not necessarily investing the massive amount of their R&D to Open Source software, and considering a 10% R&D investment, this would mean about $1B Open Source R&D.

  • How much R&D is being sponsored by Cloud providers, SaaS companies or traditional companies

If we consider the whole rest of the software industry, in the presentation above, the total wages of the developers in the world has been estimated to around 1 Trillion dollars (this is the big tower in the image).

If we look at this data from GitHub which indicates that Microsoft has 1300 contributors to OSS and Google 900. Compared to the number of engineers at Microsoft (around 60000 according to this page) and Google (37% according to these numbers in 2014 which would mean 30000 based on the current number of employees), this would mean 2% and 3% knowing that of course we don't know much about the full time nature of these contributors. We could easily estimate less than 1% for these top companies, and this would probably be much less for the rest of the tech industry.

If we consider that maybe in the best scenario, 1% of the R&D is being directed towards Open Source contributions, that would mean 10 Billions $. We could also estimate around 0,1%, which would be another $1B Open Source R&D.

  • Volunteer Time

Now the good news for Free and Open Source code is that there is the volunteer time. A study from 2014 based on hours of commit indicates that 50% of commits would be during work time versus non work time. It is not easy to validate this data, and amounts of commits, do not necessarily mean quality code. Freelancers might contribute on Open Source code outside of their paid missions, during the day. Commits might be done at the end of the day with work from the whole day. Now it's undeniable that there is non-paid Open Source contributions and according to this study it is significant. If somebody has another study of the amount of "non-paid" code, this would be very interesting. 

However, if you consider these developers have a job during the day, you can consider that their "proprietary job" is sponsoring their "evening" open source contribution.

When taking this together, if we are taking the lower estimation, it would be $2B which means the truck in the image, and in the best case $10B which would be one level of the whole tower. If we add the volunteer time on top, this could mean 2 trucks or 2 levels. I would estimate that Open Source R&D funding it's more like the truck in the image, and it's currently coming about half from Open Source companies, and half from the rest of the industry contributing. 

What is sure right now, is that not only this is very small compared to the massive amount of energy directed towards proprietary software, but the "crowdfunding" is even more microscopic compared to the "corporate" funding. 

This is why I'm worried, because looking at the evolution, it seems that we risk having less "professional open source" contributions, if VC backed companies are using non-open source licences or backing off open source, or having the "corporate" contribution become highly dependent on a consolidating industry controlling all our tech lives. The biggest risk I see, is less "professional" projects to build "end-user" applications which require a lot of fine tuning to be competitive with the cloud solutions. I don't see the cloud and internet applications provider investing in anything else than infrastructure and libraries and keeping the application and the data for themselves.

The risk, and I believe it has already started, is while we had many open source applications working on our desktop or for enterprises, while we have all the infrastructure being open source, the applications on the cloud will be controlled by proprietary providers who won't share them. We might have a lot of Open Source in the backend, but the key service is itself a proprietary service that we cannot control.

The role of developing Free and Open Source software in the sense of the FSFE.org, will remain to Open Source companies and to the vast majority of volunteers who work with almost no or little funding.

The Cloud is just another Sun

This leads me to the final talk of this FOSDEM article, The Cloud is just another Sun from Kyle Rankin from Purism (great stuff by the way). Check it out entirely because it shows a great parallel between the "Cloud Wars" and the "Unix Wars". I'm reprinting again a few slides (I hope he won't mind).

It talks to me because I do have a feeling of "déjà-vu" when looking at our the big cloud providers are dominating everything. And we all look at it thinking it's Open Source while the key aspects are being made highly proprietary. 

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What can we do?

Educate

The key question is indeed what we can do about it. We need indeed to educate again on vendor lock-in and particularly of cloud services. In Europe we already do it also because none of these big providers is actually European. As users we need to resist more the big cloud services and we need to advocate again for "Open Cloud" services, which means services that are fully Open Source.

Education is key.

Choose stronger Licences

I believe we need also stronger licences like the AGPL which pushes cloud services to contribute to the Open Source cloud services and does not allow the to fork them as proprietary softwares. I will not advocate for the SSPL licence which is pushing the limit to all the infrastructure. However a legitimate questions is how can the Open Source providers compete with Cloud providers that would contribute only marginally and sell the cloud services. As an Open Source company, the same question is showing up between those that invest in Open Source software versus those that just reuse them for profit without contributing.

However this is not an easy subject, as the stronger licence might also reduce your distribution and turn away some contributors. It is a difficult balance to find in the same way that the balance between free distribution and paying one is a difficult one.

At XWiki we have chosen to have paying modules in our app-store which are fully Open Source, but not available through install for free in the app store. If you want to use them for "free", you will need to build them yourself and run you own app-store.

Value Open Source, not the Zero price

We all confuse Open Source and Free. By doing this we push individuals or companies that try to find a balance towards "Open-Core". In the open hardware world, this is less a problem as people are used to pay for a physical object, but in the software world, we want all for free. By providing more cloud services that are "Open Cloud" we can also have a revenue stream for the cloud service and still keep the software open.

For CryptPad, this is what we are doing and many "privacy" oriented software providers are doing it this way, because it makes sense to show the code when you promise security. Now there will be a challenge to see how these services can interconnect or wether they will start competing with each other.

Finance what is not financed

We need to continue to find ways to financed what is currently not financed. We can advocate to the public funding (European for example) to finance as Open Source what is missing. This is happening with the NGI Funds for example, and us as individuals we can help more end-user projects emerge. I will make here a shameless plug for the OpenCollective of CryptPad.fr which needs your help to provide a privacy centric collaboration platform.

Kudos to the FOSDEM organizers

  • 788 talks
  • 408 hours of content
  • 600 speakers
  • 65 stands

I have to say I'm particularly impressed by the video system and the ability to validate the video of a talk and publish it in record time.

Jan 25 2019

Be Ready for FOSDEM 2019

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This year begins with one of the best conferences about free and open source software - FOSDEM. During two days experts, enthusiasts, and volunteers from all around Europe gather and share their insights into topics related to Open Source.

Over the past FOSDEM editions, we noticed that even though the event hosts plenty of developer rooms dedicated to development or infrastructure solutions, there are very few devrooms dealing with use cases impacting both technical and non-technical individuals, such as knowledge or content management.

Therefore, we have managed to create and coordinate such a room. Here's an insight into the topics that will be tackled in the Collaborative Information and Content Management Applications Devroom:

1. A Private Cloud for Everyone

Jos Poortvliet will talk about why you should care about privacy and how Nextcloud builds a private alternative for your data.

Time: 15:00 - 15:20

2. Who Needs to Know? Private-by-design collaboration

Aaron MacSween will discuss about who must have access to your data by focusing on private-by-design collaboration and CryptPad. 

Time: 15:25 - 15:45

3. Tiki: Easy Setup of Wiki-Based Knowledge Management System

Jean-Marc Libs will talk about how you can use Tiki for building up a knowledge management system.

Time: 15:50 - 16:10

4. Displaying other Application Data into a Wiki...and other Integrations

Ludovic Dubost will be there to show you how to display other application data (such as Elastic Search, Matrix/RIOT, Nagios, Cacti, JIRA, Databases) into a Wiki.

Time: 16:15 - 16:35

5. LibreOffice Online - Hosting your Documents

Michael Meeks will discuss about how you can avoid giving your documents to a large proprietary company and yet enjoy powerful collaborative editing of documents.

Time: 16:40 - 17:00

6. XWiki: a Collaborative Apps Development Platform - Build applications incrementally on top of XWiki rather than coding them from scratch

Are you planning to develop a new application from scratch? Anca Luca will explain to you how to use XWiki's features so as to assemble them in a brand-new application.

Time: 17:05 - 17:25

7. Vishkar - a CMS for Structured Content

Raja Renga Bashyam will tackle the issue of creating structured contents in a modular way.

Time: 17:30 - 17:50

8. Memex: Collaborative Web-Research

Oliver Sauter will discuss about the (im)possibility of building the perfect knowledge management tool.

Time: 17:55 - 18:15

9. CubicWeb Linked Data Browser Extension

Nicolas Chauvat will present the Web Extension that makes your browser capable of handling RDF data so that you can surf the Semantic Web and choose how data is displayed and how you interact with it.

Time: 18:20 - 18:40

10. Document Redaction with LibreOffice

Muhammet Kara will talk about preventing leakage of sensitive information by redaction in collaborative environments.

Time: 18:45 - 19:00

Moreover, if topics like Legal & Policy Issues or Design pique your curiosity, you can join Cristina DeLisle and Ecaterina Moraru in their discussions. Cristina will explain how the data protection rights are enforced by the OSS model, by analyzing some of the technologies that have risen from this ecosystem (such as Wikis), while Ecaterina will get involved into an open discussion about the difficulties that might appear when more designers contribute to Open Source projects.

See you at FOSDEM! 

You can check the entire schedule here: https://fosdem.org/2019/schedule/.

Jan 10 2019

XWiki's 2018 in review

2018 has been both challenging and rewarding at XWiki, but overall, a very productive year for us. We participated in various events, developed our products and services, received two awards for our hard work, and took great care of our team spirit.

Here is a quick revision of XWikiers` journey:

Team work makes the dream work

1. Breaking records 

In February we received the biggest reward we could have received from you, our users: an incredible increase in XWiki installs and instances activity.

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2. Amazon uses XWiki for over 1 year

The internal Wiki platform for documentation and collaboration is being used by nearly 20 000 active users, mostly in engineering and product teams, as a collaborative knowledge sharing and documentation platform. 

3. XWiki receives Best Open and Ethic Business Award 

In December we were recognized as providers of ethic software and services for over 10 years.

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4. CryptPad receives NGI startup award

Europe’s Next Generation Internet initiative (NGI.eu) awarded CryptPad the Next Generation Internet’s Privacy and trust-enhanced technologies startup award. The NGI Startup Awards recognize Europe’s most disruptive entrepreneurs who are advancing revolutionary products, solutions and services destined to have a major impact on the internet of the future.

What is new in XWiki?

1. XWiki 10.x

The 10.x cycle is defined by having an improved usability for on-boarding new users and administrators: from protection against refactoring operations, to editing inline macro content, to more auto-suggests, to a faster user interface. We managed to have over 750 issues closed: 415 bugs, 160 improvements, 31 new features and more!

2. ONLYOFFICE online editors added to XWiki`s ecosystem

Users can perform all their editing tasks directly in XWiki without having to switch between the editor and their collaboration software anymore. Furthermore, multiple users can collaborate in real time and push changes directly to XWiki.

3. XWiki Cloud free for Open Source Projects

Open source projects requesting a cloud wiki, can host their wikis with XWiki SAS at the bronze level and receive regular updates.

4. GDPR compliance with XWiki`s cookies consent application

In light of the latest European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), our team created a Cookies Consent application to help XWiki users ensure compliance. It can be installed for free and customized in such a way that it matches each brand`s identity.

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XWiki at conferences

We've been more active than ever in the international conferences and meetings scene. Whether in France, Belgium, Romania or the United States of America, our team made sure we are well represented.

1. FOSDEM 

We participated with presentations in six different tracks, tackling various hot subjects: new features, compatibility and integration with other tools and services, lessons learned from deployments, surveys, research and development, legal issues, and Artificial Intelligence.

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2. Salon Intranet

Ludovic, our CEO, had 4 talks about collaboration and wiki culture. 

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3. OW2 Meetup

At the beginning of June, we hosted a user meetup within the OW2 conference. It was a great occasion to see and meet people from the corporate and Open Source world interested in the use cases of XWiki.

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4. Libre Software Meeting

Our participating XWikiers, Clément Aubin, Ludovic Dubost and Anca Luca discussed about building a customized knowledge base in minutes, tips and tricks to finance free software, CryptPad - the Zero Knowledge editor, and Open Food Facts.

5. Hackathon in San Francisco

Ludovic, Anca, and Clement held a presentation about CryptPad, our end-to-end encrypted real-time collaboration tool. Also, they took part in a hackathon on CryptPad and XWiki.

6. Cloud Expo  Europe

We met plenty of you at our stand and discussed about digital transformation problems linked to cloud and encrypted collaboration solutions.

7. Day Click

Our HR Team met potential candidates and shared our job openings and internship opportunities with them.

8. B-Boost Convention

Ludovic took part in the round table discussion on Open Source and free models. It was a great opportunity to exchange on security topics and CryptPad, too.

9. Capitol du Libre 2018 

Ludovic brought to discussion the topic of financing free and open source software and described how collaboration with end-to-end encryption is possible using CryptPad.

10. Paris Open Source Summit 2018

We presented during the following tracks: Increasing ethics in Digital, End-user Solutions for the Workplace, Open Source Community Summit and European Open Source Law Event.

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Team life

1. XWiki Seminar 

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Both teams from France and Romania had a great time together in Brasov. The theme chosen for this year was about the topic of “bears”, considering the mountain location. 

2. Breakfast @XWiki on International Week of Happiness at Work

Armed with smiley badges, colorful balloons and inspired by the emblematic "Breakfast at Tiffany's" theme, we organized an early breakfast in Iasi and Paris, at the same time.

3. Women in Tech

PIN Magazine published an article about how in XWiki (Iasi) women proved that they can work in IT and even outnumber their male colleagues.   

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How was your 2018?